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Genuine Parts Company Names New CEO

first_imgWith more than 20 years of experience across multiple industries and functional areas, deMoulpied has particular expertise in organizations with complex technical products. Combined, his prior positions have required a spectrum of skills in corporate strategy, operations improvement, product quality, and revenue cycle management. He has an impressive history of utilizing data driven problem solving (Lean Six Sigma) and project management (PMP and CSM) to achieve strategic goals surrounding customer satisfaction, operational efficiency and improved profit.  DeMoulpied comes to LSI from the Private Client Services practice of Ernst & Young where he managed strategy & operations improvement engagements for privately held client businesses. Some of his prior roles include VP of strategic development, director of strategic initiatives, and Lean Six Sigma Master Black Belt at OptumHealth, UnitedHealth Group’s health services business, as well as Lean Six Sigma Black Belt at General Electric, where he applied operations improvement principles to customer service, supply chain and product development. A successful entrepreneur, deMoulpied is also the founder of PrestoFresh, a Cleveland-based e-commerce food/grocery business.  DeMoulpied has a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering Management from the United States Air Force Academy and a Master of Business Administration degree from the University of Dayton in Marketing and International Business. He served six years with the USAF overseeing the development of technology used on fighter aircraft and the E-3 Surveillance aircraft, finishing his career honorably as Captain. ATLANTA — Larry Prince, chairman and CEO of Genuine Parts Co.(GPC), announced that Thomas Gallagher will succeed him as president and CEO of the company. Elected to the post by the company’s board of directors, Gallagher becomes only the fourth CEO the company in its seventy-six year history. He has been with Genuine Parts Co. for 34 years. AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement In a press release issued yesterday, the company said Prince will continue in his position as chairman of the board. According to GPC spokesperson and Executive Vice President of Finance Jerry Nix, this move is part of a succession plan that has been in place for some time. “Larry is 65 years old and he deemed that this was the appropriate time [to step down,]” said Nix. _______________________________________ Click here to view the rest of today’s headlines.,Lubrication Specialties Inc. (LSI), manufacturer of Hot Shot’s Secret brand of performance additives and oils, recently announced the expansion of senior leadership. Steve deMoulpied joins LSI as the company’s chief operating officer (COO). AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement LSI President Brett Tennar says, “Steve’s success in developing operational strategies that improves the bottom line, builds teamwork, reduces waste and ensures quality product development and distribution checks many of the boxes of what we were looking for in a COO. This, coupled with his career in the Air Force working with highly technical systems and his in-depth understanding of Lean Six Sigma and Business Process Management sealed our offer. As our tagline states, our products are Powered by Science. This data driven approach is one reason why our company has grown exponentially as we employ the most advanced technology to product development. I am confident that Steve is the right person to drive operational strategy for our diverse and growing brands.” Advertisementlast_img read more

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EH: Arson Charged In December Clubhouse Fire

first_imgThe East Hampton man who claimed on New Year’s Eve to have started the fire last December that badly damaged the office area at The Clubhouse, a bar and restaurant on Daniels Hole Road, was finally charged with that crime after being taken into custody on an unrelated matter, the East Hampton Town police announced Saturday. The Clubhouse is part of the East Hampton Indoor Tennis complex, and is owned by Scott Rubenstein.Scott McKallip, 56, was initially arrested Saturday, April 27, on a petty larceny charge. Police said they had received a complaint from the manager of the IGA on North Main Street that McKallip had shoplifted several items from the store, including two Hershey’s chocolate milkshakes, two pints of Tropicana orange juice, and a container of Crush soda. The total value of the allegedly stolen property was $15.84.Soon after the December 22 fire, East Hampton Town Police, working with the Suffolk County Arson Squad, classified it as arson.Detective Sgt. Dan Toia of the East Hampton Town Police said the detective squad had just wrapped up its investigation and was planning to charge McKallip with arson on April 29. Once he was taken into custody on the petty larceny charge, the decision was made to process him on the arson charge, as well, he said. The accusatory document on file at East Hampton Town Justice Court says that McKallip “did apply an open flame to an ignitable liquid on the east wall of the East Hampton Indoor Tennis office building, causing severe damage and charring.”McKallip, who has a history of arrests, mostly on minor crimes, was arrested three times in December 2018 alone, with all of those arrests seemingly related.First, he was charged with a misdemeanor, aggravated harassment, for allegedly sending nude selfies to a woman who works at The Clubhouse. An order of protection for the woman was issued out of East Hampton Town Justice Court. The day after the December 22 fire, he was arrested again, this time on misdemeanor charges of trespassing, and violating a court order of protection. Police said he drove onto The Clubhouse property in a 2005 Ford Explorer. The order of protection specifically prohibits his coming to the woman’s workplace.On December 31, he was charged with a felony violation of the court order, when he allegedly went into Fierro’s Pizza in East Hampton Village, opposite Stop & Shop, and began shouting. At that time, witnesses said McKallip “started ranting and raving, and said he had a lawsuit against the cops” and threatened the managers of The Clubhouse. Witnesses also told police McKallip had claimed to have started The Clubhouse fire.In addition to his multiple arrests in December, McKallip was pulled over at least five times by both East Hampton Town and Village police, and issued numerous moving violations, including three speeding tickets.After his first two arrests last December, bail was set at a nominal amount, and was posted. But, after the alleged incident at Fierro’s, and the resulting felony charge, bail was set at $5000. Unable to raise that amount, McKallip was held for five days before being released,Eventually, all three cases were moved to Veterans Court. McKallip is an ex-Marine, according to court documents.McKallip was arraigned on the arson and petty larceny charges in East Hampton Town Justice Court before Justice Lisa Rana on Sunday, April 28. McKallip was represented at his arraignment by Brian DeSesa of the Adam Miller Group.McKallip appeared disheveled, and subdued, saying almost nothing.When it came time to set bail, DeSesa questioned the strength of the case against McKallip, based on the paperwork given to the court by the police. The district attorney’s office had asked, when it contacted Rana, that bail be set at $50,000, which Justice Rana agreed to, after a dialogue with DeSesa.“There is no supporting affidavit, no admission,” DeSesa said about the papers presented by the police. He said the affidavit in the file from Rubenstein, which he signed January 3, was left blank when it came to monetary damage done by the fire, which should disqualify it as an accusatory document.The charging documents, DeSesa said after court, “contain no information that puts him at the time, place, or admitting anything to do with the crime, and the affidavit on damage says zero damage was done. Nothing provided to the court this morning for arraignment purposes leads one to believe, or shows in any way that he was there. We are arraigning him on one page that has three sentences, and nothing to support it.”Detective Toia, however, saw the matter quite differently. “The complaint itself is sufficient to start the process,” he said. If and when the district attorney’s office takes the matter to a grand jury, the full case will be presented, he added.Any future challenge to the case against McKallip will be pursued by Christian Killoran, a private attorney previously appointed to represent McKallip on all matters currently in Veterans Court.t.e@indyeastend.com Sharelast_img read more

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Menendez Tours USACE’s Rahway River Flood Mitigation Project

first_imgU.S. Senator Bob Menendez toured the Rahway River in Cranford yesterday with U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Colonel David Caldwell, the New York District commander, to see firsthand their efforts to mitigate the flood threat along the entire 82-square-mile Rahway River Basin.  The senator has continued to fight in Congress to expedite this project and for federal funding needed to complete a required feasibility study.“Residents along the Rahway River live under the constant threat whenever it rains that the waters could overflow their banks, putting their loved ones in harm’s way, and destroying everything they’ve worked so hard to attain,” said Menendez.  “Fixing the flood problem along the Rahway River is my highest priority project for the Army Corps’ New York District. I have worked hard to make sure that the funding is in place to complete the feasibility study, and now seeing the plan with my own eyes, I am hopeful we can move this project forward to protect our communities and families.”The Army Corps has tentatively determined that the most effective plan of action to mitigate flooding calls for approximately 8,930 feet of trapezoidal channel improvements along the Rahway River from the end of Nomahegan Park to South Ave. in Cranford and the installation of two, new, 36-inch outlet pipes at the Orange Reservoir in Orange.The federal government has already provided $3,280,000 since the feasibility study was first authorized in 1997, including an additional $379,000, approved by the Senate in May as part of the Water Development and Related Agencies Act appropriations bill, to complete the study to determine the most effective flood mitigation design along the Rahway River Basin, which flows through Union, Essex and Middlesex Counties.[mappress mapid=”22987″]last_img read more

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Law Society warning over Registry’s early completion plan

first_imgLand Registry plans to streamline the completion process will increase solicitors’ costs and make conveyancing less efficient, the Law Society has warned. The new ‘early completion’ practice applies where an application for a discharge of whole has been received along with other applications, but without evidence of the discharge. From 3 August, the Land Registry will complete individual applications where it is possible to do so rather than rejecting the whole package. Entries relating to the existing charge will be left in the register until proof of satisfaction is received. The registry – under pressure to cut costs – estimates that delayed discharges and the subsequent requisitioning required cost it at least £3.5m a year. Joe Timothy, director of legal services, said dispositions should be reflected in the register as soon as possible after they have taken place, and the interests of buyers and sellers should not be put at risk by a refusal to register their transfers and charges because of delays in the completion of discharges of prior charges. ‘Early completion will provide protection in registration, which will make buying and selling property more certain and thus help to prevent fraud. Early completion will also remove the opportunity for fraud where the seller who currently retains legal title uses it to obtain new loans after the sale of the property,’ he said. The Law Society opposed the change, saying the costs of lenders’ failure to issue prompt discharges would be borne disproportionately by solicitors and, ultimately, by their clients. It suggested the Land Registry instead put pressure on lenders who cause delays. Peter Rodd, chairman of the Law Society’s property section, said: ‘Potentially this could be an absolute nightmare, especially where an existing mortgage is protected by a restriction. Solicitors will need to consider the timing of their application for registration to avoid the buyer and a new mortgage lender losing their ­priority.’last_img read more

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New GACAG website provides updates for air cargo industry and regulators

first_imgGACAG is an industry advisory group formed in November 2010 to provide the air cargo industry with a stronger, unified voice in its dealings with worldwide regulatory authorities and other bodies whose decisions directly impact on air cargo. It was founded by the International Federation of Freight Forwarders Associations (FIATA), theInternational Air Transport Association (IATA), the Global Shippers’ Forum (GSF), and The International Air Cargo Association (TIACA). The website provides information and updates of the four priority areas GACAG is focused on: security, e-commerce, customs and trade facilitation, and the sustainability of the global air cargo industry. It also lists the focus areas for each of its four Task Forces and identifies the members of each group. In addition to providing proactive e-news updates for registered users, the site gives updates on regulatory issues affecting the air cargo industry. It also profiles the vital role the industry plays in driving economic development. Visitors to the site can share their views on major issues facing the air cargo industry, including new areas they feel GACAG should be aware of or involved in. They can also find links to global customs bodies and non-governmental organisations as well as a listing of industry events. Pictured below, Michael Steen, chair of GACAG, said: “GACAG has been involved in a great deal of activity since its formation, initially putting its own infrastructure in place and then identifying its focus areas and objectives and forming Task Forces. More recently, we have started greater dialogue with other key groups and responded to a number of issues that either affect the air cargo industry or offer the potential to improve the way we do business. The website provides an overview of our progress to date and will be continually updated as we move forward. It also gives the industry the opportunity to talk to the Group about area issues we need to be aware of.” GACAG says it is developing closer ties with other global organisations such as the World Customs Organization,World Trade Organization, Universal Postal Union, International Civil Aviation Organization, and the Airport Services Association. Over the past year, GACAG has also had meetings with the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and U.S. Customs & Border Protection(CBP) in Washington DC.www.gacag.comlast_img read more

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Crowley and Seaboard unite in Latin America

first_imgBy sharing vessel space with two 2,500 teu capacity ships, the two companies will increase total capacity and provide a more efficient operation, as well as reducing carbon emissions in the trade lane.When the service commences in late November, each ship will load weekly at Crowley’s terminal in Port Everglades, Florida and Seaboard’s terminal in the Port of Miami, for a Friday departure.The vessels will then call at Puerto Limon, Costa Rica on Tuesdays and Manzanillo, Panama on Wednesdays and Colon, Panama on Thursdays, before departing north on Saturdays from Puerto Limon.”Our cooperation in this trade lane will allow us to continue to provide exceptional service to our customers while remaining competitive in the ever-changing market,” says Steve Collar, senior vice president and general manager of Crowley’s Latin America services.All other Crowley and Seaboard services will remain unchanged.www.crowley.comwww.seaboardmarine.comlast_img read more

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Maritime Synergy moves record-sized units

first_imgThe move was part of an ongoing project, which began in September 2012 and in which Maritime Synergy moved about 80 of the units each month, with each convoy consisting of five units.Each modular accommodation unit weighed 28.4 tonnes, with the dimensions 15.2 m x 4.3 m x 3.3 m. Due to the size of the units, the chassis on the trailers had to be custom-built for the moves.From the port of Laem Chabang, in Thailand, the cargo was shipped to Australia and discharged in the port of Dampier.One of the units has been listed as the biggest built and assembled in Thailand until now, claims the company.Maritime Synergy is a member of the Global Project Logistics Network (GPLN).  www.maritimesynergy.comwww.gpln.netlast_img read more

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NordLB in privatisation talks

first_imgAccording to media reports, the sale of HSH Nordbank to a consortium of Cerberus Capital Management and J.C. Flowers, which was announced earlier this month, will play a decisive role in the deliberations.A representative of NordLB reportedly confirmed that while various scenarios are being discussed, nothing has been decided to date.Once of the largest shipping lenders, NordLB continues to digest massive shipping losses that, in 2016 surpassed EUR1 billion (USD1.05 billion).Despite returning to profitability in 2017, Thomas Mang, president of the savings banks of Lower Saxony, which owns 26 percent of NordLB, reportedly said: “Due to its onerous ship loan portfolio, NordLB is in a difficult state.”www.nordlb.comlast_img read more

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Complaints fall at relocated London county court

first_imgSatisfaction levels with the Central London County Court appear to have improved since last year’s move to the Royal Courts of Justice, new figures suggest.The number of complaints about the court fell by 17% in the first full year after relocation from two properties in west London in May 2014.Total complaints from May 2014 to May 2015 added up to 371, down from 449 in the previous 12 months, with the number of complaints from legal representatives falling from 253 to 236. The figures were provided following a freedom of information request from the Gazette.Of the complaints made in the first year of the court being located at the Thomas More building, more than half (233) were partly or fully upheld.A total of 204 were made in relation to delay in administrative process, with 61 complaints made for correspondence or the telephone not being answered.Practitioners in previous years had bemoaned the problems of delivering skeletons and speaking with court staff, in part accelerating the need for relocation.The response also revealed that HM Courts and Tribunals Services almost offset the costs of moving within the first year of relocation.The direct cost of relocation in May 2014 was £2.71m, with HMCTS saving £2.65m in running costs in 2014/15. In subsequent years the move is expected to reap savings of £3.6m every year.Francesca Kaye, the immediate past president of the London Solicitors Litigation Association, said the savings made from the move should now be used to address the growing problems in the county court system.‘The continued absence of investment in the court service and/or IT, and with more cuts planned, means the challenge to improve the administration of the courts is now even greater, said Kaye, who is also a partner with London firm Russell-Cooke.‘Resources are at breaking point and administrative delay is increasingly a problem in the CLCC and the county court more generally.’She added that with increasingly higher-value, more complex cases being transferred from the High Court to the CLCC, there is an ‘urgent need’ for improvement.last_img read more

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Railtrack to the rescue

first_imgAS SOON as it became evident that LCR’s planned flotation in 1998 had little chance of success, discussions with Railtrack began last autumn in an effort to put a rescue package together. The original consortium members saw this as a way of preserving their interest in LCR.On February 12, Railtrack’s board confirmed its willingness to consider proposals which ’could be sensibly financed’ and offered ’commercial terms to justify involvement in a project of this risk and scale’. Negotiations in the run-up to the February 27 deadline were complicated by the fact that LCR’s concession agreement was not transferable. Termination would leave the government with no option but to invite bids for a new concession, or abandon the project.The Act of Parliament authorising construction of CTRL specifically requires all of the 108 km line to be constructed. This is deemed impossible without public funds on a scale which the Treasury would certainly oppose, despite the all-party support which the line now enjoys.Railtrack was therefore working towards a situation where it effectively took control of LCR, probably through a rights issue which would dilute the shareholdings of existing members of the consortium to nominal amounts. Provided the shell of LCR could be kept in being, delays inherent in re-bidding might thus be avoided. Virgin and National Express, both LCR members, submitted competing bids to Railtrack on February 13 for managing Eurostar (UK).The route of CTRL cannot be altered, but it could be shortened or phased if the government was willing to play ball. Railtrack has therefore been lobbying for ’Phase 1’ to be built from the Channel Tunnel to the junction east of Ebbsfleet where a link to the existing main line between London and Margate is planned. By cutting 17min off current Eurostar schedules into Waterloo, this would yield about half the revenue benefits of the full link to St Pancras.This is the easy part of the project in engineering terms, avoiding more than 20 km of tunnelling through difficult ground to get under the River Thames and the eastern suburbs of London. Construction cost would be cut to £1·3bn, which Railtrack could raise far more cheaply than LCR because the risk of a Eurotunnel style default would be lower.The rationale of tunnelling to St Pancras was that the capacity of surface routes into London would be exhausted once Eurostar carryings reached 17 million a year; back in 1991, this was expected by 2000. Likewise, freight would exceed the capacity of existing lines when carryings reached 8 million tonnes around 1998; but the actual figure for 1997 was only 2·94 million.With capacity now a distant issue, phasing CTRL becomes realistic. Powers would be retained to build Ebbsfleet as a ring motorway terminus, and then perhaps move on to Stratford and ultimately St Pancras as the case for doing so emerged.This strategy is intimately tied up with two other big projects for regional services across London: Thameslink 2000 and Crossrail. The latter is simmering gently on a back burner, but consultants bidding to manage Thameslink were advised by Railtrack on February 10 that the award of this contract had been put on hold. LCR was supposed to provide £100m of the £580m total funding to pay for a new station under the St Pancras throat – which would be excessively distant from King’s Cross Underground if the CTRL never gets there.Add in the fact that Railtrack is pitching to get control of London Underground’s infrastructure under plans for breaking up the capital’s metro which Prescott is expected to announce shortly, and the outlines of a package deal begin to emerge. oEurorail in the wingsApart from Railtrack, the only group expressing serious interest in building the CTRL is Eurorail. Despite being outbid by LCR in 1996, the consortium still exists although its composition has changed: current members are Kvaerner, BICC, NatWest Bank and Seeboard.Eurorail sought £600m more in public funding than LCR, having taken a more realistic view in 1996 of Eurostar’s medium term losses. A team of 15 is working under Chief Executive Keith Clarke, following an approach to government last November when it became obvious that LCR was in serious trouble.Unlike Railtrack, Eurorail is not negotiating with LCR, but would seek to bid for a new concession if the existing one was terminated on February 27. It has indicated that CTRL construction would not start until Eurostar was profitable, setting back completion until 2007 at the earliest. olast_img read more

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