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Was trading by nomads crucial to the rise of cities?

first_imgShepherds like these watching sheep and goats in Azerbaijan were long thought to have played a crucial role in the trade that spurred the world’s oldest’s cities. The new techniques now suggest that before 1000 B.C.E., pastoralists in Jordan, Syria, Turkey, and Iran stayed too close to home to have served as international middlemen. At a site in Amman, for example, Cheryl Makarewicz, an archaeozoologist at Germany’s University of Kiel, analyzed sheep and goat tooth enamel dating to about 7000 B.C.E. for ratios of carbon and oxygen isotopes. Because those isotopes can reflect local soil and water, they provide a geographic fingerprint of where an animal grazed. She discovered that the animals fed in the vicinity, rather than in distant grasslands. At the 7000 B.C.E. town of Çatalhöyük in eastern Turkey, another team analyzed carbon and nitrogen isotopes from sheep and goat teeth collagen and found that there, too, the animals grazed nearby. Their dung also revealed that they ate more fodder than wild grass, a sign the animals lived mainly in pens rather than wandering long distances.Later, as cities arose, Hammer and Arbuckle, along with archaeologist Dan Potts of New York University in New York City, argue that pastoralists stayed largely on the outskirts to meet urban demand for meat and milk, as well as the wool that helped drive the Mesopotamian textile industry. “There are livestock processing centers,” Hammer notes. “You can’t take the animals too far.”If nomads weren’t the long-distance traders of the ancient world, most goods must have moved by other means—and discoveries in the past decade suggest one possibility. Archaeologists have found that cities and towns were far more common in the Bronze Age Middle East than once thought. That would have allowed trade to be sustained through social networks, created by royal marriages and traveling merchants, rather than nomads, Potts says.Texts from around 1900 B.C.E. found at the Anatolian town of Kanesh describe how merchant families organized donkey caravans that crossed 1000 kilometers to reach Assur, a city south of today’s Mosul in Iraq. “These are urban people, and there is no reason to think this wasn’t going on in 3000 B.C.E. or even 3500 B.C.E.,” Potts adds. Michalowski agrees: “There were a lot of entrepreneurs, and trade seems to have been mainly in private hands. … You don’t have to invoke mobile pastoralists.”Only when domesticated dromedary camels appeared in the first millennium B.C.E. did nomads begin long seasonal treks, Hammer, Arbuckle, and Potts say. “We are not denying pastoralists exist,” Hammer says. “Only that they were traveling long distances and living in tents. And we have the bones, the campsites, and the paleobotany to show this.”Many of their colleagues remain unpersuaded. “If true, this is very revolutionary,” says Guillermo Algaze, an archaeologist at the University of California, San Diego. But he still thinks that mobile pastoralists were the glue that held together extensive trade networks in early urban societies. Steve Rosen, an archaeologist at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in Beersheba, Israel, praises Hammer and Arbuckle’s approach. But he has found a string of archaeological sites in the Negev Desert indicating that, at least there, pastoralists used donkeys to cross more than 100 kilometers of harsh terrain as early as 3000 B.C.E.New data from Mesopotamia, such as analyses of animal bones and dung from the renewed excavations at Ur, where Hammer has recently been working, could help settle the debate. Whether marauding nomadic tribes or local ruffians provoked Zimri-Lim’s nightmare may finally become clear. *Correction 21 December, 1:55 p.m.: An earlier version of this story misstated where Hammer’s and Arbuckle’s paper will be published. Was trading by nomads crucial to the rise of cities? Emily Hammer Anonymous Archaeologists generally agree that not long after humans started farming in the Near East about 10,000 years ago, pastoralists began caring for newly domesticated sheep, goats, and cattle. But researchers debate just when these groups began to travel vast distances in a seasonal cycle to seek greener pastures.Alizadeh and archaeologists such as Yale University’s Frank Hole assert that pastoralists on the fringes of Mesopotamia migrated hundreds of kilometers as early as 7000 B.C.E. They base this conclusion on the movements of modern pastoralists who drive flocks of sheep and goats up and down the steep valleys of the Zagros Mountains in Iraq and Iran. The researchers also point to excavations of seasonal villages and graves that hint at a prehistoric roving life.Once the first urban areas arose, valuable stones, metals, and timber from Afghanistan, Iran, and Anatolia poured into southern Mesopotamia. By 2000 B.C.E., an organized trading system supplied materials from as far east as the Indus civilization and as far west as the Levant to the wealthy city-state of Ur. Although archaeologists have long thought nomadic herders were a key conduit, few early texts record who moved these goods. “Trade is textually almost invisible,” says Piotr Michalowski, a cuneiform specialist at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. “We don’t know how they got their stuff.”  Archaeologist Emily ​Hammer examines stone foundations, a marker of ancient herding life, at a Turkish site where modern Kurdish pastoralists still pitch their tents. By Andrew LawlerDec. 19, 2017 , 4:25 PM Nearly 4000 years ago, in the royal palace of the Mesopotamian city of Mari, King Zimri-Lim awoke from a nightmare in which nomads from the surrounding desert had captured his beloved wife. Archaeologists have long thought that that Zimri-Lim’s fear, described in a cuneiform text, reflects the key roles that nomads played in early urban life. These mobile marauders, powerful enough to trouble the sleep of rulers, were tolerated for the exotic goods they carried from faraway places. Traveling hundreds of kilometers in search of grazing land, pastoralists have long been seen as likely architects of the long-distance trade networks that helped spur the rise of the world’s first civilization around 3000 B.C.E., in what is now Iraq.Because physical traces of ancient pastoralists are often all but invisible, researchers relied heavily on comparative studies of 20th century Middle Eastern nomads in building this picture. But archaeologists are increasingly using new methods to read the faint clues left by ancient nomads. Armed with data from animal dung, bones, dental calculus, and plant remains, these researchers suggest herders mainly stuck close to and served the needs of specific urban areas, rather than migrating between far-flung cities. “They were not traveling long distances, so they are not the natural conduit for trade,” says Emily Hammer, an archaeologist at the University of Pennsylvania.That assertion, which Hammer and archaeologist Ben Arbuckle of the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill lay out in a forthcoming paper in the Journal of Archaeological Research, has touched off intense debate about how early urban life flourished. To Abbas Alizadeh of the University of Chicago in Illinois, who has spent decades studying pastoralists such as the Bakhtiari of southwest Iran, Hammer and Arbuckle “are completely wrong—I bet they’ve never even seen a nomad in their life.” Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

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Watch researchers turn a wall into Alexa’s eyes and ears

first_img These walls might as well have ears. Eyes, too. Researchers have found an inexpensive way to turn walls into giant touch screens that can also sense what a person is doing nearby and when the TV, microwave, or computer are turned on and off. These interactive walls could make electronic personal assistants, such as Alexa or Cortana, much smarter, enabling them to assist better in managing a household. Imagine, for example, a TV that turns on as you sit down on the sofa, or Alexa letting you know that your kids have snuck into the living room to play video games.The first step was converting a wall into an antenna. The engineers first taped a grid onto the wall, then painted over it with a water-based compound containing nickel. They removed the tape, which left behind a pattern of metallic diamonds that act as electrodes. They then connected the electrodes to a computer and painted the wall with standard latex paint, hiding any sign of its new capabilities.Touching or moving an arm or limb close to the wall changes the wall’s electrostatic fields, just as a finger touching an iPad does, the group reports this week at a conference on computing in Montreal, Canada. TVs, computers, and other electronic devices generate distinctive electromagnetic fields, which the walls also sense.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Eventually such walls—which the team created for $20 per square meter—could feed this information to electronic personal assistants, making them true household helpers. Watch researchers turn a wall into Alexa’s eyes and ears By Elizabeth PennisiApr. 27, 2018 , 1:35 PMlast_img read more

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Japanese spacecraft drops a third rover on asteroid Ryugu

first_img Hayabusa2 itself is likely to make the first of three touchdowns on the asteroid to collect samples later this month. It will start its journey back to Earth in late 2019.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) JAXA Hello #Earth, hello @haya2kun! I promised to send you some pictures of #Ryugu so here’s a shot I took during my descent. Can you spot my shadow? #AsteroidLanding pic.twitter.com/dmcilFl5ms— MASCOT Lander (@MASCOT2018) October 3, 2018 After successfully dropping two small hopping rovers on the surface of asteroid Ryugu last month, the Japanese spacecraft Hayabusa2 today deployed another probe with a suite of instruments that will do some serious science. Hayabusa2, which arrived at Ryugu in June after a 3.5-year journey, descended to 51 meters above the asteroid and released the Mobile Asteroid Surface Scout (MASCOT). Twenty minutes later, the asteroid’s gravity had pulled the 10-kilogram probe, 30 by 30 by 20 centimeters in size, to the surface.The Minerva hopping rovers deployed on 21 September have cameras snapping some amazing pictures, but minimal scientific instrumentation. MASCOT, jointly developed by the German Aerospace Center and the French National Centre for Space Studies, carries a camera, instruments to measure day-to-night thermal changes and check for magnetism, and an infrared spectral microscope to study the mineral composition and look for any evidence the asteroid once hosted water or organic molecules. MASCOT will collect data in one location, then hop to a second for another round of observations. About 16 hours after deployment, MASCOT’s batteries will run down and the observation phase of the mission will be over.A photo MASCOT took as it approached Ryugu was posted on Twitter earlier. An artist’s impression of the MASCOT rover, which carries a suite of scientific instruments, after today’s landing on Ryugu Japanese spacecraft drops a third rover on asteroid Ryugu By Dennis NormileOct. 3, 2018 , 9:35 AMlast_img read more

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Scientists decry USDA’s decision to end cat parasite research

first_img The laboratory is “an incredible resource,” says Robert Yolken, a pediatric infectious disease specialist at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland. “It’s a loss for Toxoplasma research in the U.S. and around the world.”But parasitologist Jim Keen, a former USDA scientist now at the University of Nebraska in Lincoln, sees things differently. Last month, he and the White Coat Waste Project, a Washington, D.C.–based advocacy group, released a report that argues the laboratory’s work is “unnecessary and unjustifiable.” The 14-page document, titled USDA Kitten Cannibalism, details how researchers fed infected meat, including cat meat, to kittens, in order to harvest parasite oocysts—infective, hardy forms of the organism—from their feces. Researchers then euthanized the animals, killing dozens each year, because they might spread the parasite if adopted as pets. Keen reviewed 121 Toxoplasma studies published between 1985 and 2018 that involved killing cats or dogs and had Dubey as a co-author. He concluded that much of the lab’s recent work is “irrelevant to American public health and the USDA’s mission.”Outside scientists disagree. The lab has made several key contributions in the past decade, says David Sibley, a Toxoplasma researcher at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. One was developing a blood test that can inform parasite control strategies. The test indicates whether a person has become infected by eating undercooked meat or by ingesting parasite oocysts shed by cats.The report marked the latest salvo in White Coat Waste’s efforts to end cat use at USDA’s Animal Parasitic Diseases Laboratory in Beltsville, which housed the Toxoplasma facility. The group has placed billboards attacking USDA on buses and this year persuaded 61 members of Congress to sponsor the Kittens In Traumatic Testing Ends Now (KITTEN) Act. One KITTEN Act co-sponsor, Representative Brian Mast (R–FL), called closing the program “a decisive victory against government animal abuse and wasteful spending.”But many researchers say the lab’s demise will undermine efforts to fight the devastating parasite, which is the world’s leading infectious cause of blindness and causes roughly 190,000 babies to be born with defects each year. In the United States, which has about 1 million new infections annually, it is the second-leading food-borne killer, causing about 750 deaths.“There is no laboratory in the world” that produces T. gondii oocysts with the same efficiency, says one U.S. researcher, who asked for anonymity to avoid being targeted by animal activists. “Centralizing production actually minimized waste and the number of cats required.” (Several scientists predict the closure will drive cat use to less-expert U.S. labs, or offshore.)The loss of the lab will slow efforts to develop a vaccine to protect cats from infections, scientists say. That’s a top public health priority, and one that Dubey was pursuing, because it would stop the animals from shedding the oocysts that infect both livestock and people.The closure will affect collaborations by U.S. and European researchers to develop better methods of detecting parasite oocysts in drinking water and soil. Other imperiled studies focus on keeping T. gondii out of the food supply. One—requested by USDA inspectors—is examining whether U.S. rules for curing hams are stringent enough. Another is testing methods for cleaning oocysts from fresh fruits and leafy greens. Other studies are probing why the parasite makes only some infected people very sick.Scientists are also worried about the fate of the Beltsville lab’s unparalleled collection of more than 1000 T. gondii strains and its trove of tissue samples and reagents. “They can’t just throw them away,” says geneticist Chunlei Su of the University of Tennessee in Knoxville, who used the lab’s DNA samples to study the parasite’s global genetic diversity.Knoll, for her part, says losing access to oocysts from the lab will disrupt her studies—which aim to find alternatives to cats in Toxoplasma research. WHITE COAT WASTE PROJECT VIA FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT By Meredith WadmanApr. 9, 2019 , 5:10 PM Scientists decry USDA’s decision to end cat parasite researchcenter_img A closed laboratory relied on cats to sustain its research program. For the past 37 years, a small research lab in Beltsville, Maryland, has been the world’s leading hub for scientists working on Toxoplasma gondii, a parasite that infects more than 1 billion people globally, causing death, blindness, and birth defects. Operated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), the facility is a source of expertise and rare, sought-after materials for researchers working to stop the parasite, which can be transmitted by food and has no human vaccine and no cure.But last week, the lab fell victim to pressure from animal welfare activists and members of Congress concerned about its use of cats, the only animal in which T. gondii completes the sexual stages of its life cycle. USDA abruptly announced it was shutting down the lab’s work, saying the program, which cost $625,000 annually to operate, had “reached its maturity” and “achieved” its agricultural research goals.The 2 April decision, which lab chief Jitender Dubey learned about from media reports, has left researchers scrambling for alternatives. “I’m really angry about this,” says Laura Knoll, a parasitologist at the University of Wisconsin in Madison who relies on samples from the laboratory. During a December 2018 external review of the lab she took part in, she says, “The validity and necessity of the research never seemed to be in question.” (USDA declined to answer a list of questions from Science and denied a request to interview Dubey.)Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

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Update: Mount Sinai institute director facing discrimination allegations leaves post

first_img *Update, 3 July, 12:41 p.m.: The director of the Arnhold Institute for Global Health, who is facing allegations of age and gender discrimination, is leaving that position, the dean of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai announced in an email today. Prabhjot Singh “has chosen to step down” as chair of the Department of Health System Design and Global Health, and as director of the institute, wrote Dean Dennis Charney. Singh will remain on the medical school’s faculty, and Rachel Vreeman, a physician-researcher who has specialized in treating children living with HIV, will become the institute’s interim director, Charney wrote.*Update, 23 May, 4:23 p.m.: The co-chairs of the Board of Trustees at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai yesterday told the medical school’s faculty that the board is forming a “special committee to review matters related to the allegations of discrimination,” as well as any other related issues. “We appreciate that this matter has generated concern,” Richard Friedman and James Tisch wrote in an email to faculty. They promised the board’s special committee “will act consistently with the values that shape this institution.”*Update, 21 May, 4:30 p.m.: On 16 May, hundreds of faculty and staff at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and the affiliated Mount Sinai Health System wrote to the organization’s board of trustees, demanding an external investigation of the lawsuit’s allegations. As of today, 369 faculty and staff have signed the letter, which calls the lawsuit’s allegations “profoundly disturbing” and urges the board to implement a policy of “zero tolerance” for harassment. A lawsuit targets a global health institute and the dean of the Icahn School of Medicine in New York City, which is part of the Mount Sinai Health System. Homieg340/Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA) Here is our original story from 2 May: The faculty and staff letter follows a similar letter to the board sent on 6 May by more than 300 Mount Sinai medical students. “We are compelled to speak out by the shocking acts of discrimination on the basis of gender, age, and race described in the lawsuit,” the students wrote.center_img By Meredith WadmanJul. 3, 2019 , 1:00 PM Update: Mount Sinai institute director facing discrimination allegations leaves post Seven current and former female employees have sued officials at a global health institute that is part of the Mount Sinai Health System’s Icahn School of Medicine in New York City, claiming age and sex discrimination. They claim the medical school’s dean, Dennis Charney, hired an underqualified man to direct the center, and allege that the director then drove out women who were in their 40s and older and preferentially hired younger men. An eighth plaintiff on the lawsuit, a man, claims discrimination based on race, religion, and national origin.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The 174-page lawsuit, filed on 26 April, names as defendants Charney and three men at the Arnhold Institute for Global Health (AIGH), which designs technology and systems to improve the health of poor communities. It makes a number of allegations against center Director Prabhjot Singh, who was hired in 2015, including that he disparaged, demoted, and marginalized female employees; lied to funders about the status of a software project; and did not seek required ethics reviews for some research projects.The plaintiffs also allege that Singh countenanced abuse of female employees by David Berman, who was Singh’s chief of staff at the time, and Bruno Silva, the institute’s director of design and product development. Silva, the lawsuit alleges, called female co-workers and donors “bitches” and “c—s,” and that Singh “did nothing to curb him.” Berman “was known for violent screaming at women … which Singh nonchalantly ignored,” the lawsuit alleges.Berman, who could not be reached for comment, left the institute last summer. The Icahn School of Medicine declined to make Charney, and the two other defendants who still work at AIGH, available for interviews. The medical school said it does not comment on pending litigation but stated that: “We deny the allegations of discrimination … [and] expect to vigorously defend the action.” It also noted that, “Consistent with the School of Medicine’s longstanding commitment to equity and inclusion, when employees in the Institute for Global Health brought concerns to our attention last year, we promptly initiated an internal review after which appropriate steps were taken.”The lawsuit, which was filed in U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York, alleges that the internal review, which was prompted by a complaint from some of the plaintiffs and other employees, was insufficient, as were the resulting actions. And it paints an unflattering picture of Charney, a prominent neurobiologist and psychiatrist. It depicts him driving away a senior woman who had been chosen by a search committee to lead AIGH, and instead hiring Singh, who was 32 years old at the time.Singh has a medical degree from Cornell University and a doctorate in neural and genetic systems from Rockefeller University in New York City. He was a visiting assistant professor of international and public affairs at Columbia University from 2011 to 2015 and was a staff associate and then a postdoctoral scientist at Columbia’s Earth Institute from 2007 to 2011.The lawsuit alleges that Singh wanted to remake AIGH into a Silicon Valley–like startup with a “bro culture” dominated by young men. “Dr. Singh directly [hired] largely younger, male friends and contacts, despite their lack of experience in global health,” states a press release issued by McAllister Olivarius, a law firm in Saratoga Springs, New York, that is representing the plaintiffs. “He disbanded the Institute’s Advisory Board, an important source of fundraising, because he considered its members ‘ladies who lunch.’”The plaintiffs include Holly Atkinson, 66, a physician and former medical journalist who built and directed the human rights program at AIGH. The lawsuit states that in 2015, Singh demoted Atkinson from her director position, began to assign her tasks such as maintaining a Mailchimp list, and told her she would have to take a pay cut of $60,000 if she wanted to remain on staff. Atkinson left the institute in 2016.Another plaintiff, Natasha Anushri Anandaraja, 44, is a pediatrician and tropical medicine expert who directed global health education at AIGH. Singh “regularly denigrated Anandaraja’s work with harsh and cutting critiques,” the lawsuit alleges. “[H]e was careful not to leave a paper trail demonstrating his frequent cruelty.” Anandaraja left the center in 2016. (She has since returned to Mount Sinai part time in another capacity and does not report to Singh.)The male plaintiff, Humale Khan, is a computer scientist who left the institute in February. He and other plaintiffs allege that Singh misled funding groups about a software project supported by the U.S. Agency for International Development in Washington, D.C. Singh, the lawsuit alleges, told funders the project was advancing and had hundreds of users, when it was in fact “vaporware … a vague collection of specifications and unfinished code.” The lawsuit also alleges that Singh violated a law meant to protect patient data and failed to get required ethics committee approvals for some projects involving human subjects.AIGH had been called Mount Sinai Global Health. But after a $12.5 million, 2013 donation from the Arnholds, a prominent New York banking family, it was renamed in their honor.*Correction, 4 May, 7 p.m.: This article has been updated to correct Prabjhot Singh’s previous positions at Columbia University.last_img read more

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Microbe that got man drunk could help explain common liver disease

first_img The researchers next analyzed feces from 43 patients with NAFLD, 32 of whom had the severe form, and compared them with 48 healthy people. The team found high levels of high-alcohol- (HiAlc) or medium-alcohol-producing K. pneumoniae strains in samples from 61% of the patients versus 6% of the controls.To probe further whether these gut microbes might explain the liver disease, the researchers fed mice HiAlc K. pneumoniae, alcohol, or a mixture of yeast and sugars as a control. By 4 weeks, mouse given the bacteria or alcohol had evidence of liver damage, but the others did not. The researchers also put microbes from the original patient into mice raised germ free. Again, the animals suffered liver damage. “The studies are carefully done, and the results are quite convincing,” says gastroenterologist Anna Mae Diehl, whose lab at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, specializes in NAFLD.Viruses known as phages can kill specific bacteria. In HiAlc-infected mice pretreated with the phages that target those bacteria, the rodents did not suffer any detectable liver abnormalities. “This raises the possibility that phage might be used to treat NASH,” Haslam says.The medical literature offers no evidence that people with NAFLD feel drunk when they don’t drink alcohol, and mice with HiAlc did not develop measurable blood alcohol levels. So the researchers decided to also give those rodents high doses of glucose. Blood alcohol levels skyrocketed in the mice, which behaved as if they were inebriated. Giving glucose or fructose to the NAFLD patients similarly produced big jumps in blood alcohol levels that healthy controls didn’t experience. This result suggests giving oral glucose coupled with a blood alcohol test could lead to a diagnostic for HiAlc K. pneumoniae and possibly even predict which NAFLD patients will progress to NASH. “That’s very intriguing and exciting if confirmed in larger human trials,” Haslam says.Yuan and colleagues report that the initial patient they studied recovered from his bacteria-driven autobrewery syndrome after he began to take antibiotics and changed his diet. His NASH has abated, too. Her team is now planning to study the gut microbes of a large group of people, including children, over time. “We want to investigate why some people have high-alcohol-producing strains of K. pneumoniae in their gut while others don’t,” she says.Diehl cautions that the new study speaks only to a subset of NAFLD patients. But she predicts “this work will attract a lot of attention.” Some strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae in the gut can turn starchy and sugary foods into alcohol. Jing Yuan, Capital Institute of Pediatrics Ami Images/Science Source Microbe that got man drunk could help explain common liver diseasecenter_img A man in China who, after eating high-carbohydrate or sugary meals, became so intoxicated that he blacked out, has led researchers to discover strains of bacteria in the human gut that could be an important driver of the world’s most common liver disease.That condition, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), affects an estimated 1 billion people worldwide, and nearly one in three Americans. The excess fat in liver cells that is characteristic of the disease usually does not cause any symptoms, but in about 25% of people with NAFLD, the accumulation progresses and sometimes causes life-threatening cirrhosis or liver cancer. Scientists found that that the Chinese man’s odd malady stems from gut bacteria that synthesize alcohol from his meals. Researchers say the finding could lead to better ways of predicting who will develop severe forms of NAFLD and may even suggest ways to thwart its progression.Obesity, diabetes, and other conditions are associated with NAFLD, but no single underlying mechanism explains why fat builds up in the liver of so many people. Some studies have tied gut bacteria to NAFLD, but the idea has remained controversial. The complexity of intestinal flora makes it difficult to sort the contributions of single species. The new finding, published in Cell Metabolism today, focuses on a novel strain of Klebsiella pneumoniae that predominates in a small cohort of NAFLD patients and also caused liver damage in mouse experiments. “I have to admit this is pretty impressive,” says infectious disease specialist David Haslam of Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center in Ohio, who has been circumspect about earlier attempts to tie intestinal microbes to NAFLD.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Jing Yuan, a microbiologist at the Capital Institute of Pediatrics in Beijing and lead author of the paper, says she and her colleagues became intrigued in June 2014, when a 27-year-old man sought care in Beijing for bouts of unexplained intoxication that dated back 10 years and were getting worse. Some thought he must be a closet drinker, and his mother regularly had him use a breathalyzer. That showed high blood alcohol levels even when she was certain he had not had alcohol. Even odder, when he drank several colas, he sometimes became drunk.Doctors previously had diagnosed the man’s intoxication problem as autobrewery syndrome, a rarely reported condition in which people become drunk from starchy or sugary foods. It is thought to be caused by gut fermentation, aided by an abundance of yeast. But antifungal treatment had no effect on the man. Liver biopsies showed he had nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), the severe form of NAFLD. He was moved to the intensive care unit and closely observed. Doctors noted that after he ate a meal high in sugar, his blood alcohol level rose to as high as 400 milligrams per deciliter. “That’s equivalent to 15 shots of 40% [80-proof] whisky,” Yuan says.Because some other microbes can metabolize sugars into alcohol, Yuan and colleagues analyzed 14 of the man’s stool samples taken at different times for species-specific bacterial DNA fragments. They found that when he was most intoxicated, 18.8% of the bacteria in a sample were K. pneumoniae, a 900-fold increase over normal. When they put these bacteria in a medium of yeast and sugar, they could isolate strains of the bacterium that produced high, medium, or low levels of alcohol. That’s equivalent to 15 shots of 40% [80-proof] whisky. By Jon CohenSep. 19, 2019 , 11:25 AMlast_img read more

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Motta new Genoa favourite?

first_img Watch Serie A live in the UK on Premier Sports for just £11.99 per month including live LaLiga, Eredivisie, Scottish Cup Football and more. Visit: https://subscribe.premiersports.tv/ Former Genoa midfielder Thiago Motta is emerging as the favourite to replace Aurelio Andreazzoli as the club’s Coach. Genoa seemed to be warming to ex-Juventus assistant Massimo Carrera after they were again rejected by Gennaro Gattuso. However, Gianluca Di Marzio’s website reports owner Enrico Preziosi is “intrigued” by the idea of bringing in Motta. The 37-year-old relaunched his playing career with the Rossoblu during the 2008-09 campaign as he went on to join Inter and Paris Saint-Germain. He moved into coaching with PSG’s Under-19 team last season but vacated the role over the summer. The former Italy international is also currently enrolled on an FIGC coaching course at Coverciano.last_img read more

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Mazzarri demands ‘same Juve spirit’

first_img Watch Serie A live in the UK on Premier Sports for just £11.99 per month including live LaLiga, Eredivisie, Scottish Cup Football and more. Visit: https://subscribe.premiersports.tv/ Torino boss Walter Mazzarri has called on his side to show the same hunger against Brescia as they did in the derby with Juventus last week. The Granata lost the derby 1-0 to a Matthijs de Ligt goal, but Mazzarri – speaking at his pre-Brescia Press conference – was happy with the performance of his team. “In the derby we regained our compactness, we put in a strong performance. The lads must show the same spirit as they did against Juve. “We must make the most of this positivity, we have to face every team the same way we did last Saturday.” The former Watford coach has a mini injury crisis on his hands, with Simone Zaza the latest to fall victim. “I had times in the past when I had lots of players absent [through injury], but I never talked about it. “There’s no need to cry about it. I don’t want any alibis, I just want to motivate the players who come in as replacements.” Among those is winger Iago Falque, although Mazzarri was more positive about Spaniard and winger Alex Berenguer. “Iago’s had an awkward year. He had an injury and now he has another not so small. We hope to get him back soon. Berenguer’s doing well.”last_img read more

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Pjanic allays injury fears

first_imgMiralem Pjanic has reassured Juventus fans that the injury he suffered against Lecce does not look serious. The midfielder was replaced by Sami Khedira 24 minutes into the second half of the 1-1 draw with the newly-promoted side, coming off with a suspected thigh problem. After completing tests this morning, the Bosnian put up a picture on Instagram with his thumb up and the caption “all is good” to dampen fears of a long-term injury. However, it remains to be seen if he will be fit enough to take to the field against Genoa this Wednesday or in the Derby della Mole with Torino after that. Watch Serie A live in the UK on Premier Sports for just £11.99 per month including live LaLiga, Eredivisie, Scottish Cup Football and more. Visit: https://subscribe.premiersports.tv/last_img read more

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Montella: ‘Cagliari superior in every way’

first_img Watch Serie A live in the UK on Premier Sports for just £11.99 per month including live LaLiga, Eredivisie, Scottish Cup Football and more. Visit: https://subscribe.premiersports.tv/ Vincenzo Montella has to concede “Cagliari were superior in every way” after his Fiorentina were flattened 5-2. “We didn’t wake up until 5-0 down.” Only a late brace from young striker Dusan Vlahovic, his debut Serie A goals, prevented it being an even heavier result at the Sardegna Arena. “There’s no much to say, really,” shrugged the coach on DAZN. “Cagliari were superior in every way, tactically, physically, psychologically and above all – which is the real problem – temperamentally. “We were too soft in every challenge and didn’t wake up until after we went 5-0 down. The only positive was the late Vlahovic brace, which was probably because by that stage we were no longer under any pressure to get a result. “I had been waiting since last season for Vlahovic to score this goal and he finally shrugged off that pressure, towards the end putting in the kind of performance I expect from someone with his potential. “It’s a very young squad, we know that, and there are the issues that go with that lack of experience. We were not mentally at 100 per cent, we made big mistakes all over the pitch.”last_img read more

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New Italy away kit unveiled

first_img Image credit figc.it Italy have unveiled their new away shirt, following in the vein of their controversial green jersey. The kit, which bears the tagline ‘Crafted From Culture’, will be worn during Italy’s final two Euro 2020 qualifiers against Bosnia-Herzegovina and Armenia. Puma says it has “combined a modern design with a Renaissance-inspired pattern, integrating them into a white jersey.” “The design offers an elegant, typically Italian look, which blends the culture and style of the country in an international kit, with the aim of enhancing the aspirations of success of the new generation, with a view to future European Championship and World Cup commitments,” the FIGC added in its Press release. The shirt takes its stylistic cues from the commemorative green jersey the Azzurri wore during the previous international break. Watch Serie A live in the UK on Premier Sports for just £11.99 per month including live LaLiga, Eredivisie, Scottish Cup Football and more. Visit: https://subscribe.premiersports.tv/last_img read more

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Cricket writer Peter Roebuck committed suicide, says South African police

first_imgFormer Somerset captain and well-known commentator and journalist Peter Roebuck has committed suicide, the South African police said.Roebuck, aged 55, died at his hotel in Newlands, Cape Town where he was covering the current Test series between Australia and South Africa.South African police released a statement confirming that Roebuck took his own life, reported ESPN Cricinfo.”This office can confirm that an incident occurred last night at about 21:15 at a hotel in Claremont where a 55-year-old British national who worked as an Australian commentator committed suicide,” the statement said.”The circumstances surrounding this incident is being conducted. An inquest docket has been opened for investigation,” it said.Roebuck was covering Australia’s ongoing Test tour, including as a radio commentator for the ABC.”He was spoken to by local police on his return to the Southern Sun Hotel Newlands Saturday night after he had been out to dinner,” the report said.A statement issued by the hotel said “an incident that occurred at Southern Sun Newlands” was currently under full police investigation.Roebuck was the captain of Somerset in the 1980s before beginning a long media career, primarily working for Fairfax and the ABC.He wrote for The Age and The Sydney Morning Herald (SMH).Fairfax Media, which publishes SMH, issued a statement on the death of Roebuck.”It is with great shock that we have learnt today that Peter Roebuck has died in Newlands, South Africa.””Peter was not only an extremely gifted cricket writer for The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age, he was also one of Australia’s most popular cricket commentators for the ABC. In his youth he played for the English county Somerset, then made his home in Australia. In recent years he built a reputation as one of the best columnists on the sport,” Fairfax Media chief executive Greg Hywood was quoted as saying in Sydney Morning Herald.advertisementRoebuck’s death came as a shock to the cricket world. “It is one of the saddest days in my life,” said former Test spinner and ABC cricket commentator Kerry O’Keeffe.The manager of ABC Grandstand, Craig Norenbergs, praised Roebuck for his work in broadcasting and reporting cricket.”Incredibly sad news. He was an integral part of the Grandstand commentary team apart from being a magnificent print journalist,” said Norenbergs.”For us he could describe a game of cricket in such a way that even if you didn’t like the game, you liked the way that he went about his business.”Roebuck would regularly travel with the Australian cricket team and split the rest of his year living between Sydney and Pietermaritzburg, South Africa.Born in England, Roebuck had a fine cricket career before pursuing media interests.He made his first class debut for Somerset in 1974 and played 335 four-day matches and 298 county one-day games. He scored 33 first-class centuries and passed 1,000 runs nine times in 12 seasons of country cricket.John Stern, former editor of The Wisden Cricketer said: “Shocking and sad news about Peter Roebuck. One of the two or three best writers on cricket in the world.”Lawrence Booth, editor of the Wisden Almanack said: “Cricket has lost one hell of an intellect and a bloke who cared deeply about the game. I always read Peter Roebuck with complete admiration.”Roebuck penned several books on cricket. His diary of the 1983 season, ‘It Never Rains’ established him as one of cricket’s most insightful and strong voices. He also wrote an autobiography ‘Sometimes I Forgot To Laugh’.last_img read more

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Olympics 2012: Police says no to FBI

first_imgA senior British police officer has firmly ruled out deployment of any foreign armed guards, including the FBI of the US, in London during the 2012 Olympics.Assistant Commissioner Chris Allison insisted that armed agents from other countries will not be permitted at the Olympic Games. Moreover, the National Olympic Security coordinator maintained that preparations of safety and security are “in a good place”.Allison rubbished reports that the United States was dissatisfied with security arrangements and would send up to 500 armed FBI agents to protect US interests.Allison confirmed that most countries are likely to send “security liaison officers” who will work with British police.”Some teams bring liaison officers with them, they’re not protection officers,” he added.- With inputs from IANSlast_img read more

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NCAA volleyball: San Sebastian starts life after Soltones era

first_imgSan Sebastian head coach Roger Gorayeb said they’ve brushed off last season’s championship heartbreak after they saw their thrice-to-beat advantage crumble against title-holder Arellano University.“We’re already looking at the future,” said Gorayeb. “In fact, after this year, we have four or five recruits coming in and we expect them to really make a significant impact on the team right away.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games openingSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSan Sebastian will now rely on the defensive leadership of Alyssa Eroa while leaning on May Guillema, Joyce Stan Rita, and Dangie Encarnacion on offense.“We’re still a fighting team but we have to avoid injuries,” said Gorayeb. Champions Lady Chiefs will start their title defense against Mapua with Jovielyn Prado leading the charge against te Lady Cardinals at 1:30 pm.Backing up Prado are Regine Arocha, Necole Ebuen, and Andrea Marzan as Arellano shoots for its third title in four years.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next MOST READ Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games SEA Games: PH still winless in netball after loss to Thais BeautyMNL open its first mall pop-up packed with freebies, discounts, and other exclusives PH military to look into China’s possible security threat to power grid Jordan delivers on promise: 2 Cobra choppers now in PH Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. LATEST STORIES San Sebastian Lady Stags. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netThings will be a lot different for San Sebastian as it starts life in the NCAA Season 93 women’s volleyball tournament without three-time MVP Grethcel Soltones who graduated from the team in 2016.The Lady Stags will face off against Emilio Aguinaldo College in the 12 pm opening game at Filoil Flying V Centre.ADVERTISEMENT Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim ‘A complete lie:’ Drilon refutes ‘blabbermouth’ Salo’s claims Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ Mountain bike world champ seriously hurt in car crash ‘We cannot afford to fail’ as SEA Games host – Duterte View commentslast_img read more

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Ceres’ AFC bid resumes vs Brisbane

first_imgView comments SEA Games: PH still winless in netball after loss to Thais LATEST STORIES MOST READ Eustaquio says he has edge in five-round fight vs Akhmetov in rematch Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games BeautyMNL open its first mall pop-up packed with freebies, discounts, and other exclusives Jordan delivers on promise: 2 Cobra choppers now in PH Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next ‘A complete lie:’ Drilon refutes ‘blabbermouth’ Salo’s claims Kickoff is set 5 p.m. (Manila time) at Queensland Sport and Athletic Stadium.Making the task even more difficult for the Busmen, who won the Asean zonal finals of the AFC Cup last year, is the fact that Brisbane is already in the middle of its season, although the Roar is running eighth.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games openingSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hosting“It’s still the second week of preseason for us so we are obviously unprepared to play these kind of games,” said Ceres coach Risto Vidakovic, who survived Myanmar’s Shan United to set up a meeting with the Roar.The winner of the match will travel to China to face Tianjin Quanjian in the final round of qualifying. PH military to look into China’s possible security threat to power grid ‘We cannot afford to fail’ as SEA Games host – Duterte While it sees playing in the Asian Football Confederation (AFC) Champions League as a bonus, Philippines Football League champion Ceres-Negros is determined to put up a creditable showing as it continues its qualifying bid on Tuesday against one of the top Aussie sides in Brisbane Roar.A couple of weeks after returning from the holiday break, the Busmen are looking to pull off one of the biggest upsets in tournament history against a team that finished third in the Australian League last season.ADVERTISEMENTlast_img read more

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Raqraquin, San Beda not discouraged by NCAA Finals game 1 loss

first_imgIt turned out to be a huge confidence-booster for Raqraquin and the Lady Red Spikers after they showed they can take the Lady Chiefs to the distance in Finals game 1 on Friday.“This was a huge help in our confidence, even though we lost,” said Raqraquin. “We saw that we shouldn’t be scared of Arellano because we know we can dominate and we showed that in the third set and we were also able to contain them in then fourth”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games opening“I told my teammates that they shouldn’t be afraid of Arellano, and told them to look at whoever is in front of them. ‘Look at them, would you allow yourself to be beaten? Would you let yourself be intimidated? Fight them.’”San Beda lit up in the third set with a commanding 11-2 run to take a 21-12 lead off Nieza Viray’s through-the-block kill. This sudden surge in the middle set gave the Lady Red Spikers the confidence boost they needed in the fourth set, but unfortunately the Lady Chiefs had them by the throat come the fifth period.“I think we got really tired come the fifth set, and I also take the blame for it,” said Raqraquin, who had a game-high 21 points. “I was preparing myself for those hard serves but they [Lady Chiefs] would instead go for a short serve.”Although San Beda ultimately fizzled in the fifth, Raqraquin said that it’s only the first game and they still have a chance to force a rubber match.“We shouldn’t be saddened by this loss, it’s still not over,” said Raqraquin. “We still have a chance on the next games.”ADVERTISEMENT San Beda Lady Red Spikers. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netIt was a loss to remember for San Beda, but not for the negative reasons.The Lady Red Spikers suffered a five-set loss to defending champion Arellano University in the title round of the NCAA Season 93 women’s volleyball tournament, 25-15, 25-16, 15-25, 22-25, 15-6, but captain Cesca Raqraquin said the setback shouldn’t be taken at face value.ADVERTISEMENT Judiciary Committee set to take over Trump impeachment probe ‘We cannot afford to fail’ as SEA Games host – Duterte ‘A complete lie:’ Drilon refutes ‘blabbermouth’ Salo’s claims View comments BeautyMNL open its first mall pop-up packed with freebies, discounts, and other exclusives Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games SEA Games: PH still winless in netball after loss to Thaiscenter_img PH military to look into China’s possible security threat to power grid MOST READ Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. LATEST STORIES Magnolia frustrates GlobalPort to halt two-game skid Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’last_img read more

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Kings take shot at bringing NBA All-Star game to Sacramento

first_imgLATEST STORIES Larry Nance Jr. to wear his dad’s retired No. 22 with Cavs The bid promises to take fans from transportation hubs to accommodations and venues in 30 minutes or less by the use of self-driving vehicles and dedicated traffic lanes.Ranadive believes the arena raised the bar on technology and environmentalism for sports venues. There are “smart turnstiles” that allow fans to enter at more than triple the usual speed and the NBA’s first 4K ultra HD video board that stretches 84 feet long.The arena is the first professional sports venue powered completely by solar energy, saving about 1 million gallons of water a year compared with a typical venue of its size. It was built with recycled material from the mall that stood at the site before construction began and gets 90 percent of its food and beverages from within 150 miles.“I think when we built the arena we had a goal that it would be the best arena that had ever been built,” Ranadive said. “It would be an iconic structure to look at. It would give the fans an experience like no other. To be able to share that with the entire basketball loving world is obviously a huge privilege and would be a treat for us to do that.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. SEA Games: PH still winless in netball after loss to Thais View comments Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim Judiciary Committee set to take over Trump impeachment probe ‘We cannot afford to fail’ as SEA Games host – Dutertecenter_img BeautyMNL open its first mall pop-up packed with freebies, discounts, and other exclusives MOST READ Getting the game would cap a remarkable comeback for Sacramento, which nearly lost its franchise to Seattle in 2013 before Ranadive bought the team and put together a deal to build a state-of-the-art downtown arena.“I think it would be a recognition of the fact that the city went all-in on the Kings,” Ranadive said. “It would be the ultimate recognition that the city pulled it off. There’s a love affair between the Kings and the city and the NBA. It would be an exclamation point on that love affair.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games openingWinning the bid won’t be easy. The Golden State Warriors want the game for their new arena in downtown San Francisco that is set to open for the 2019-20 season. Milwaukee is also bidding, with its new arena set to open next season. Other cities also will get involved.Commissioner Adam Silver said at the All-Star game last weekend in Los Angeles that he generally supports a bid from Sacramento with one major caveat. “Sacramento and the surrounding communities provide a tremendous opportunity for an All-Star. Wine country, great golf, great scenery, all kinds of wonderful things that I think people would love to visit around an All-Star. But at the end of the day, we have to have a sufficient number of hotel rooms,” he said.Ranadive said new projects will ensure the city meets the NBA’s requirement of about 6,000 rooms in the area. But the bid will offer even more options with up to 1,000 rooms through a partnership with Airbnb, as well as two or three 300-room small luxury cruise ships in the Port of Sacramento.Silver said he would be open to that possibility, pointing out that USA Basketball players and guests have used cruise ships for accommodations at the Olympics, including the 2016 Games in Rio de Janeiro.“Not only will we meet the requirement but we’ll also give them a choice,” Ranadive said. “Do they want to be on a beautiful river? Do they want to be in a beautiful home? Or do they want to be in a hotel room? All of that will be accessible in less than 30 minutes.”The events surrounding the game will be anchored by the Golden 1 Center, with an indoor-outdoor Global Pavilion near the capitol to host concerts and food events that show off the region.ADVERTISEMENT Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games PH military to look into China’s possible security threat to power grid ‘A complete lie:’ Drilon refutes ‘blabbermouth’ Salo’s claims FILE – In this Sept. 27, 2016, file photo, Vivek Ranadive, the majority owner of the Sacramento Kings, poses in the new Golden 1 Center in Sacramento, Calif. The Kings are expected to bid on hosting the 2022 or 2023 NBA All-Star Game. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, file)The Sacramento Kings are looking to bring the NBA All-Star game to California’s capital for the first time.Kings owner Vivek Ranadive, Mayor Darrell Steinberg and tourism officials are set to detail plans for the bid for the game in 2022 or ’23 on Thursday and submit an application to the league Friday.ADVERTISEMENTlast_img read more

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Clippers’ Patrick Beverley fined $25K for throwing basketball at fan

first_imgDon’t miss out on the latest news and information. Another case filed vs Cardema MOST READ View comments SEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completion Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim LATEST STORIES Los Angeles Clippers guard Patrick Beverley (21) throws a ball at a fan during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Dallas Mavericks in Dallas, Sunday, Dec. 2, 2018. Dallas won 114-110. Beverley was ejected from the game. (AP Photo/Michael Ainsworth)NEW YORK — Los Angeles Clippers guard Patrick Beverley has been fined $25,000 by the NBA for throwing a basketball at a fan during a game in Dallas.The fine was handed down Tuesday by league discipline executive Kiki VanDeWeghe.ADVERTISEMENT Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Judiciary Committee set to take over Trump impeachment probe Jordan delivers on promise: 2 Cobra choppers now in PH NU Lady Bulldogs bag 5th straight UAAP title with 80 straight wins Fossil launches its newest generation smartwatch: The Gen 5 The incident occurred with 9:10 remaining in the fourth quarter of the Clippers’ 114-110 loss to the Mavericks on Sunday.Beverley and Mavericks guard Dennis Smith Jr. wrestled on the floor for a loose ball, their second loose-ball scramble of the game. After Beverley got up holding the ball, he threw a bounce pass to a Mavericks’ fan sitting courtside, which the fan caught. That drew a technical foul and an ejection.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chiefHe said after the game that the fan uttered an expletive about his mother. SEA Games: PH dancesport looking to sweep golds Hotel management clarifies SEA Games footballers’ kikiam breakfast controversy Read Nextlast_img read more

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