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Area Sales Representative – San Antonio or Austin, Texas – Dorman Products

first_imgA dedicated position, concentrating on generating sales/awareness and support of new products, new programs and updates to Dorman Direct Distributors and their customer base. This position will dedicate efforts and time in a coordinated fashion with the Area Sales Managers, Key Direct Distributors, and all Downstream Customers.AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement Essential Duties and Responsibilities: This description in no way states or implies that these are the only duties to be performed by this position.  The incumbent will perform other job-related duties as assigned. Core Responsibilities: • Support sales efforts of Dorman’s Distributors with sales calls on company stores, independent jobbers and service dealers to generate awareness and pull-through sales of Dorman’s product portfolio. • Provide services to Dorman’s Distributors including, but not limited to; coordinating and conducting changeovers, return documentation, inventory updates, and customer physical inventories. • Possess a working knowledge of all Direct Dorman Distributors in the assigned region and develop a working relationship with Distributor personnel. • Manage assigned accounts personally through regularly scheduled sales. • Maintain Sales Support Materials and possess a working knowledge of all product categories   Additional Responsibilities: • Coordinate downstream product and sales training • Assist with key regional trade shows, maximizing profitable sales results • Assess the product needs of the WD’s Jobbers and Installers and communicate information back to the company for new product evaluation • Accumulate competitive data for information bank building • Maintain constructive relationships within the Sales, Product Management, Marketing, and Operations departments • Update Monthly and Weekly reports as directed • Up to 75% local and overnight travel required. Weekend travel required. • Timely and regular attendanceAdvertisement Supervisory Responsibilities: This job has no supervisory responsibilities. Qualifications: To perform this job successfully, an individual must be able to perform each essential duty satisfactorily. The requirements listed below are representative of the knowledge, skill, and/or ability required. Reasonable accommodations may be made to enable individuals with disabilities to perform the essential functions. • Functional computer knowledge in Excel, Word, and PowerPoint required • Excellent written and verbal communication skills • Excellent presentation skills • Can work well independently, and in a team environment • Strong organization skills, ability to multi task required • Priority setting and project management skills required Education and/or Experience: University Degree or 5 years aftermarket experience.  Sales experience direct to the WD, Jobber and Installer level preferred. Language Skills: Ability to write reports, business correspondence, and procedure manuals.  Ability to effectively present information and respond to questions from groups of managers, clients, customers, and the general public. Mathematical Skills: Ability to apply concepts of and calculate figures and amounts such as discounts, interest, commissions, proportions, percentages. Reasoning Ability: Ability to interpret a variety of instructions furnished in written, oral, diagram, or schedule form. Physical Demands: The physical demands described here are representative of those that must be met by an employee to successfully perform the essential functions of this job. Reasonable accommodations may be made to enable individuals with disabilities to perform the essential functions.Advertisement While performing the duties of this job, the employee is frequently required to stand; walk; sit; use hands to finger, handle, or feel; reach with hands and arms and talk or hear. The employee is occasionally required to climb or balance and stoop, kneel, crouch, or crawl.  The employee will be required to perform change-overs and lift boxes when needed. Work Environment: The work environment characteristics described here are representative of those an employee encounters while performing the essential functions of this job. Reasonable accommodations may be made to enable individuals with disabilities to perform the essential functions.  The noise level in the work environment is usually moderate.  The employee will be required to work in different locations when needed. Interested applicants can submit a resume and cover letter to Dorman by clicking the Apply Now button below.last_img read more

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Longtime Gazette sportswriter Jim Schiltz thrives on the action

first_imgCategories: Editorial, OpinionIf you’ve been to any local high school sporting events over the past 32 years, the chances are pretty good that you may have seen Gazette sportswriter Jim Schiltz roaming the sideline or watching the action from press row.Jim has covered high schools for the newspaper almost exclusively since 1987. Over that span of time, he’s covered thousands of games/events (his tally is somewhere around 6,000 at last estimate) and he’s interviewed a similar number of athletes, coaches, athletic directors.In his trademark Mets ball cap, Jim is a familiar figure at Section II events, everywhere from Schoharie to Saratoga and Mechanicville to Fort Plain.Over the years, he’s covered all the great athletes, all the best teams. But he’s also written his fair share of offbeat stories about athletes who’ve overcome great physical challenges and mediocre teams that defied the odds to win championships.Jim, after all, is in it for the stories. He appreciates greatness, no doubt. But he mostly just loves a good story.One of Jim’s most memorable assignments involved a real nail-biter of a football game between crosstown rivals Schalmont and Mohonasen. The action was back and forth, back and forth. Scoring, however, was at a premium on this day. Schalmont eventually broke the stalemate, but not with a touchdown or field goal. It was a safety. The game’s final score: 2-0. More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Make a game plan for voting. Do it now.EDITORIAL: No chickens in city without strong regsFoss: Schenectady Clergy Against Hate brings people togetherEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsFoss: Schenectady homeless assistance program Street Soldiers dealing with surge in need Jim came to the Gazette in 1985, just a month out of college. For two years, he worked as a clerk in the sports department, staffing the desk at night to do local bowling roundups, horse-racing agate and other tasks. Within two years, Jim took over as the high school guy and, as he’s proud of saying, he never left that position.The sports beat was a natural fit for Jim. At Guilderland High School, he played receiver and safety on the football team. On the lacrosse squad, he played midfield and also was named a team captain.For college, Jim went to SUNY Morrisville, where he studied journalism technology, and then SUNY Oswego, where he was a communications major.As a full-fledged member of the Gazette’s sports staff, Jim became known for his evenhanded approach to story selection, both in terms of the sports that he elected to cover and which games he chose to cover in those disciplines.“Jim would look at a Friday night high school schedule and closely examine it before finally deciding where he should go,” one former colleague recalled. “He wanted to make sure he covered the game that meant the most to the most people.”“And he gave each sport its due,” the colleague added. “Jim was a high school football player at Guilderland, but he didn’t try to minimize other minor sports. He even became an avid field hockey fan.”Beyond his egalitarian approach to coverage, Jim has made a name for himself as one of the good guys. His amiable demeanor and easygoing style are traits that have served him well in his dealings with players, parents, coaches. They’ve also made him a well-liked member of the entire Gazette staff. For years, he was a key player on the newspaper’s softball team, where he played shortstop and was a key hitter in the batting lineup. He was a nifty fielder and the team’s spark plug.“He was always up” for the games, remembers Jim’s longtime colleague Jeff Wilkin.“Jim was great for morale, great for the game,” said Wilkin, the softball team’s captain. “We used to kid around that he ‘made the hard plays look easy …. and the easy plays look hard!’”Jim’s passion on the softball field was right in line with his commitment to his job.“Covering high school sports isn’t just a job for Jim Schiltz,” one longtime colleague said of him. “It’s a calling.”Miles Reed is the editor of The Daily Gazette. He can be reached by calling 518-395-3106 or emailing reed@dailygazette.com. Then there was the time when a sectional basketball game between Guilderland and Columbia went to five overtimes. Jim was there for the epic battle, pen and pad in hand. He still made deadline. It was a night he’ll never forget.Stories like these are part of the history of Capital Region sports, as they are part of the history of Jim’s career. After all these years on the beat, Jim is part of the the local sports landscape, not merely an observer.Last week, Jim’s contributions to the local sports scene, especially his reportage on high school football, were recognized with the announcement that he’ll be inducted into the Capital Region Football Hall of Fame this summer.It’s a wonderful honor for him, but it came as no surprise to Jim’s peers in local sports media.“With his encyclopedic knowledge, first-hand experience and unbridled passion, Jim in many ways embodies the sport in the Capital Region,” one former local sports scribe wrote to me in an email.Similar sentiments were expressed by colleagues around the region, including competitors at other outlets.“Having covered high school sports with him for years, I know a number of coaches and former players who think very highly of him,” wrote another longtime local sports writer. “He is passionate about what he does, and they all appreciate that.”last_img read more

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Letters to the Editor for Tuesday, April 7

first_imgAddress problem of discarded glovesI would like to say that at this horrific time I notice some folks taking extra precautions.Gloves and masks are becoming the norm for some folks. My gripe is about where they end up after folks leave the store — on the ground, in a shopping cart or anyplace they land when they don’t hit a trash can.Elected officials might want to address this situation. Litter is litter, but in all actuality this is almost compared to discarding medical waste.I always applaud the retail industry and the cashiers and stockers and whole staff that show up and put themselves in harm’s way having to deal with the public to make sure shelves are full. I worked in the industry for 20 years, so I have respect for these people.Patricia HarringtonSchenectadyNow is not the time to bring back sportsIn the world of sports, there has been speculation of plans to bring back sports as soon as possible, such as MLB having opening day in early June.However, in spite of all the talk of bringing professional sports back quickly, wouldn’t sports be among some of the last things to come back?There is a difference between the government saying you can go to your office cubicle to work in somewhat isolation, or eat in a local restaurant with customer traffic restrictions, and having national sports teams’ players and staff travel the country.Adam OstranderPrincetownKeep coronavirus patients downstateDoes anyone out there question why Gov. Andrew Cuomo is allowing patients infected with the coronavirus to be transported upstate to our local hospitals?  It does not seem like that is practicing “social distancing.”Why isn’t he sending up the non-infected patients who only require hospital care up here and let all the downstate patients with the virus stay in one place?Seems like that would be a much better way to stop the spread.Paula SchaefferGlenvilleMore from The Daily Gazette:HIGH NOTES: PPEs, fighting hunger, backpacks and supplies for kidsEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Don’t repeal bail reform law; Fix it the right wayFoss: Schenectady Clergy Against Hate brings people togetherEDITORIAL: Take a role in police reforms Categories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionCounty OT deal not fiscally conservativeAs a former supervisor in Saratoga County, I am appalled by the actions of the temporary compensation committee regarding overtime pay to managerial positions. What has happened to the county’s fiscal conservatism and loyalty to the taxpayers? Pay those who are in harm’s way.Fred AcuntoCharltonlast_img read more

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Air Products to highlight LNG products at Gastech

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

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Schal’s Stalingrad

first_imgSubscribe now for unlimited access Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAYlast_img read more

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It pays to go zero carbon

first_imgStay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe now for unlimited access Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more

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The use of construction technology in disaster recovery zones

first_imgStay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe now for unlimited access Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more

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AAPA names new officers

first_imgFriedman began his one-year term on October 10. As board chairman, Friedman also serves as the association’s US delegation chair, whose other officers include: chairman-elect, Gary G. Nelson, from the port of Grays Harbor; vice chairman, Mario Cordero from the port of Long Beach; and immediate past chair, Steve Cernak from port Everglades. The Canadian delegation officers include Carl Laberge, Sean Hanrahan and Denis Caron. Chairing the Caribbean delegation this year is Glenn Roach from Barbados Port. The chairman-elect is John Bishen, St. Vincent and the Grenadines Port Authority; and the vice chairman is Orlando Forbes from Freeport Harbor Company (Bahamas).Officers of the Latin American delegation are Giovanni Benedetti, Javier González Silva, and Angel Elías. www.aapa-ports.orglast_img read more

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USA to cancel Iranian oil waivers

first_imgEarlier this week, US President Donald Trump confirmed that Japan, South Korea, Turkey, China and India would no longer be exempt from US sanctions if they continue to import oil from Iran after the waivers end.The goal of the policy is to bring Iranian oil exports to zero and deny the country’s government its principal source of revenue.A statement from the Trump administration read: “The USA will continue to apply maximum pressure on the Iranian regime until its leaders change their destructive behaviour, respect the rights of its people, and return to the negotiating table.”Meanwhile, the US State Department said: “We have had extensive and productive discussions with Saudi Arabia, the UAE, and other major producers to ease this transition and ensure sufficient supply. This, in addition to increasing US production, underscores our confidence that energy markets will remain well supplied.”last_img read more

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Cheers erupt as Puerto Rico slowly emerges from blackout

first_img SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP) – Cheers erupted as lights slowly began to flicker on across Puerto Rico overnight as the U.S. territory struggled to emerge from an island-wide blackout following a fire at a power plant that caused the aging utility grid to fail.More than 390,000 of 1.5 million homes and businesses served by the power utility had electricity restored by late Thursday, with cries of, “The lights are back on!” echoing through some neighborhoods.Gov. Alejandro Garcia Padilla said he expected more than half of customers to have power by Friday morning.“The number is rising rapidly,” he said, adding that 90 percent of customers will likely have power by Saturday. However, he cautioned: “Problems may arise. I don’t want to create false expectations.”The blackout hit the entire island of 3.5 million people early Wednesday afternoon and prompted Garcia to activate the National Guard and declare a state of emergency. Public schools remained closed on Friday, and heavy storms that hit the island Thursday afternoon knocked out power to some areas where electricity had been restored.While those with power celebrated a return to normalcy, others lamented having to face another night in darkness with no air conditioning in the tropical heat. Most Puerto Ricans don’t have generators, and many expected to once again drag mattresses out to balconies and porches to spend the night outside.“It’s been horrible,” said San Juan resident Elizabeth Maldonado, adding that she was resigned to another sleepless night. “I take showers every three hours at night to stay refreshed.”For those who could afford it, hotels offered special rates for residents that were quickly snapped up.As sunset approached on Thursday, long lines formed at ice plants, supermarkets and gas stations. Elsewhere, people crouched around power outlets at generator-powered supermarkets and malls to charge cellphones.Traffic lights remained dark most of Thursday, and police officers stood in the streets directing traffic all day, some in heavy downpours. Workers at the main international airport filled out luggage tickets by hand.The governor said at least one person died the first night from exposure to carbon monoxide after setting up a personal generator. A 76-year-old man was taken to the hospital in good condition after spending the night trapped in an elevator at a government building, Garcia said. In addition, four police officers were hit while directing traffic but were expected to recover.Localized power outages are common in Puerto Rico, which has an outdated energy infrastructure, but widespread failures such as this are extremely rare.The Electric Power Authority said it was trying to determine what caused the fire at the Aguirre power plant in the southern town of Salinas. The fire apparently knocked out two transmission lines that serve the broader grid, which tripped circuit breakers that automatically shut down the flow of power as a preventive measure, officials said. Executive director Javier Quintana said a preliminary investigation suggests that an apparent failure on one transmission line that might have been caused by lightning caused the switch to explode.Garcia rejected suggestions the blackout was caused by maintenance problems that have plagued the utility for years, largely a result of the island’s economic and fiscal crisis. He said the switch where the fire happened had been properly maintained.It was not yet clear how much damage the fire caused. The utility is struggling with a $9 billion debt that it hopes to restructure as it faces numerous corruption allegations. Company officials have said they are seeking revenue to update outdated equipment. Do you see a typo or an error? Let us know. Published: September 23, 2016 12:10 AM EDT Cheers erupt as Puerto Rico slowly emerges from blackout SHARElast_img read more

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