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How ‘death microbes’ can help police solve crimes

first_imgEarly in the decay, for instance, bacteria from the Moraxellaceae family and the genus Acinetobacter begin gorging on dying human cells. Soon after, the Rhizobiaceae family, often involved in breaking down nitrogen sources, takes over. The gases produced by these bacteria cause the body to bloat and eventually rupture, allowing oxygen in and giving aerobic species the upper hand. Microscopic worms also start to multiply, probably feasting on the bacterial biomass now covering the corpse. When you die, a new life begins for the billions of microbes you carry with you. Unchecked by your immune system, waves of species start multiplying and breaking down your body. Microbes from the environment join in as well. Geneticist Jessica Metcalf of the University of Colorado, Boulder, hopes this macabre procession can provide a microbial clock that can help investigators tell the time of death more precisely than they can with current methods, which rely on body temperature, rigor mortis, and insects. Metcalf first showed that she could use microbes, combined with a statistical model, to pinpoint the time of death of mice to within 3 days, even weeks after death. Then her team took samples from four human bodies at a so-called body farm, where cadavers are placed outside so that forensic scientists can study how they decompose. In a paper published in Science (8 January, p. 158), they reported that, again, the microbial dance was predictable enough to set a clock. “Over 25 days our error rate is about 2 to 4 days,” says Rob Knight of the University of California, San Diego, who is collaborating with Metcalf. In a large new project, the researchers will expose 36 bodies, three at each of three different body farms, in all four seasons. That will help them further calibrate their clock further and tell them how it is affected by the environment.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Read more of our special package that examines the hurdles and advances in the field of forensicslast_img read more

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Was trading by nomads crucial to the rise of cities?

first_imgShepherds like these watching sheep and goats in Azerbaijan were long thought to have played a crucial role in the trade that spurred the world’s oldest’s cities. The new techniques now suggest that before 1000 B.C.E., pastoralists in Jordan, Syria, Turkey, and Iran stayed too close to home to have served as international middlemen. At a site in Amman, for example, Cheryl Makarewicz, an archaeozoologist at Germany’s University of Kiel, analyzed sheep and goat tooth enamel dating to about 7000 B.C.E. for ratios of carbon and oxygen isotopes. Because those isotopes can reflect local soil and water, they provide a geographic fingerprint of where an animal grazed. She discovered that the animals fed in the vicinity, rather than in distant grasslands. At the 7000 B.C.E. town of Çatalhöyük in eastern Turkey, another team analyzed carbon and nitrogen isotopes from sheep and goat teeth collagen and found that there, too, the animals grazed nearby. Their dung also revealed that they ate more fodder than wild grass, a sign the animals lived mainly in pens rather than wandering long distances.Later, as cities arose, Hammer and Arbuckle, along with archaeologist Dan Potts of New York University in New York City, argue that pastoralists stayed largely on the outskirts to meet urban demand for meat and milk, as well as the wool that helped drive the Mesopotamian textile industry. “There are livestock processing centers,” Hammer notes. “You can’t take the animals too far.”If nomads weren’t the long-distance traders of the ancient world, most goods must have moved by other means—and discoveries in the past decade suggest one possibility. Archaeologists have found that cities and towns were far more common in the Bronze Age Middle East than once thought. That would have allowed trade to be sustained through social networks, created by royal marriages and traveling merchants, rather than nomads, Potts says.Texts from around 1900 B.C.E. found at the Anatolian town of Kanesh describe how merchant families organized donkey caravans that crossed 1000 kilometers to reach Assur, a city south of today’s Mosul in Iraq. “These are urban people, and there is no reason to think this wasn’t going on in 3000 B.C.E. or even 3500 B.C.E.,” Potts adds. Michalowski agrees: “There were a lot of entrepreneurs, and trade seems to have been mainly in private hands. … You don’t have to invoke mobile pastoralists.”Only when domesticated dromedary camels appeared in the first millennium B.C.E. did nomads begin long seasonal treks, Hammer, Arbuckle, and Potts say. “We are not denying pastoralists exist,” Hammer says. “Only that they were traveling long distances and living in tents. And we have the bones, the campsites, and the paleobotany to show this.”Many of their colleagues remain unpersuaded. “If true, this is very revolutionary,” says Guillermo Algaze, an archaeologist at the University of California, San Diego. But he still thinks that mobile pastoralists were the glue that held together extensive trade networks in early urban societies. Steve Rosen, an archaeologist at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in Beersheba, Israel, praises Hammer and Arbuckle’s approach. But he has found a string of archaeological sites in the Negev Desert indicating that, at least there, pastoralists used donkeys to cross more than 100 kilometers of harsh terrain as early as 3000 B.C.E.New data from Mesopotamia, such as analyses of animal bones and dung from the renewed excavations at Ur, where Hammer has recently been working, could help settle the debate. Whether marauding nomadic tribes or local ruffians provoked Zimri-Lim’s nightmare may finally become clear. *Correction 21 December, 1:55 p.m.: An earlier version of this story misstated where Hammer’s and Arbuckle’s paper will be published. Was trading by nomads crucial to the rise of cities? Emily Hammer Anonymous Archaeologists generally agree that not long after humans started farming in the Near East about 10,000 years ago, pastoralists began caring for newly domesticated sheep, goats, and cattle. But researchers debate just when these groups began to travel vast distances in a seasonal cycle to seek greener pastures.Alizadeh and archaeologists such as Yale University’s Frank Hole assert that pastoralists on the fringes of Mesopotamia migrated hundreds of kilometers as early as 7000 B.C.E. They base this conclusion on the movements of modern pastoralists who drive flocks of sheep and goats up and down the steep valleys of the Zagros Mountains in Iraq and Iran. The researchers also point to excavations of seasonal villages and graves that hint at a prehistoric roving life.Once the first urban areas arose, valuable stones, metals, and timber from Afghanistan, Iran, and Anatolia poured into southern Mesopotamia. By 2000 B.C.E., an organized trading system supplied materials from as far east as the Indus civilization and as far west as the Levant to the wealthy city-state of Ur. Although archaeologists have long thought nomadic herders were a key conduit, few early texts record who moved these goods. “Trade is textually almost invisible,” says Piotr Michalowski, a cuneiform specialist at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. “We don’t know how they got their stuff.”  Archaeologist Emily ​Hammer examines stone foundations, a marker of ancient herding life, at a Turkish site where modern Kurdish pastoralists still pitch their tents. By Andrew LawlerDec. 19, 2017 , 4:25 PM Nearly 4000 years ago, in the royal palace of the Mesopotamian city of Mari, King Zimri-Lim awoke from a nightmare in which nomads from the surrounding desert had captured his beloved wife. Archaeologists have long thought that that Zimri-Lim’s fear, described in a cuneiform text, reflects the key roles that nomads played in early urban life. These mobile marauders, powerful enough to trouble the sleep of rulers, were tolerated for the exotic goods they carried from faraway places. Traveling hundreds of kilometers in search of grazing land, pastoralists have long been seen as likely architects of the long-distance trade networks that helped spur the rise of the world’s first civilization around 3000 B.C.E., in what is now Iraq.Because physical traces of ancient pastoralists are often all but invisible, researchers relied heavily on comparative studies of 20th century Middle Eastern nomads in building this picture. But archaeologists are increasingly using new methods to read the faint clues left by ancient nomads. Armed with data from animal dung, bones, dental calculus, and plant remains, these researchers suggest herders mainly stuck close to and served the needs of specific urban areas, rather than migrating between far-flung cities. “They were not traveling long distances, so they are not the natural conduit for trade,” says Emily Hammer, an archaeologist at the University of Pennsylvania.That assertion, which Hammer and archaeologist Ben Arbuckle of the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill lay out in a forthcoming paper in the Journal of Archaeological Research, has touched off intense debate about how early urban life flourished. To Abbas Alizadeh of the University of Chicago in Illinois, who has spent decades studying pastoralists such as the Bakhtiari of southwest Iran, Hammer and Arbuckle “are completely wrong—I bet they’ve never even seen a nomad in their life.” Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

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Microbe that got man drunk could help explain common liver disease

first_img The researchers next analyzed feces from 43 patients with NAFLD, 32 of whom had the severe form, and compared them with 48 healthy people. The team found high levels of high-alcohol- (HiAlc) or medium-alcohol-producing K. pneumoniae strains in samples from 61% of the patients versus 6% of the controls.To probe further whether these gut microbes might explain the liver disease, the researchers fed mice HiAlc K. pneumoniae, alcohol, or a mixture of yeast and sugars as a control. By 4 weeks, mouse given the bacteria or alcohol had evidence of liver damage, but the others did not. The researchers also put microbes from the original patient into mice raised germ free. Again, the animals suffered liver damage. “The studies are carefully done, and the results are quite convincing,” says gastroenterologist Anna Mae Diehl, whose lab at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, specializes in NAFLD.Viruses known as phages can kill specific bacteria. In HiAlc-infected mice pretreated with the phages that target those bacteria, the rodents did not suffer any detectable liver abnormalities. “This raises the possibility that phage might be used to treat NASH,” Haslam says.The medical literature offers no evidence that people with NAFLD feel drunk when they don’t drink alcohol, and mice with HiAlc did not develop measurable blood alcohol levels. So the researchers decided to also give those rodents high doses of glucose. Blood alcohol levels skyrocketed in the mice, which behaved as if they were inebriated. Giving glucose or fructose to the NAFLD patients similarly produced big jumps in blood alcohol levels that healthy controls didn’t experience. This result suggests giving oral glucose coupled with a blood alcohol test could lead to a diagnostic for HiAlc K. pneumoniae and possibly even predict which NAFLD patients will progress to NASH. “That’s very intriguing and exciting if confirmed in larger human trials,” Haslam says.Yuan and colleagues report that the initial patient they studied recovered from his bacteria-driven autobrewery syndrome after he began to take antibiotics and changed his diet. His NASH has abated, too. Her team is now planning to study the gut microbes of a large group of people, including children, over time. “We want to investigate why some people have high-alcohol-producing strains of K. pneumoniae in their gut while others don’t,” she says.Diehl cautions that the new study speaks only to a subset of NAFLD patients. But she predicts “this work will attract a lot of attention.” Some strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae in the gut can turn starchy and sugary foods into alcohol. Jing Yuan, Capital Institute of Pediatrics Ami Images/Science Source Microbe that got man drunk could help explain common liver diseasecenter_img A man in China who, after eating high-carbohydrate or sugary meals, became so intoxicated that he blacked out, has led researchers to discover strains of bacteria in the human gut that could be an important driver of the world’s most common liver disease.That condition, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), affects an estimated 1 billion people worldwide, and nearly one in three Americans. The excess fat in liver cells that is characteristic of the disease usually does not cause any symptoms, but in about 25% of people with NAFLD, the accumulation progresses and sometimes causes life-threatening cirrhosis or liver cancer. Scientists found that that the Chinese man’s odd malady stems from gut bacteria that synthesize alcohol from his meals. Researchers say the finding could lead to better ways of predicting who will develop severe forms of NAFLD and may even suggest ways to thwart its progression.Obesity, diabetes, and other conditions are associated with NAFLD, but no single underlying mechanism explains why fat builds up in the liver of so many people. Some studies have tied gut bacteria to NAFLD, but the idea has remained controversial. The complexity of intestinal flora makes it difficult to sort the contributions of single species. The new finding, published in Cell Metabolism today, focuses on a novel strain of Klebsiella pneumoniae that predominates in a small cohort of NAFLD patients and also caused liver damage in mouse experiments. “I have to admit this is pretty impressive,” says infectious disease specialist David Haslam of Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center in Ohio, who has been circumspect about earlier attempts to tie intestinal microbes to NAFLD.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Jing Yuan, a microbiologist at the Capital Institute of Pediatrics in Beijing and lead author of the paper, says she and her colleagues became intrigued in June 2014, when a 27-year-old man sought care in Beijing for bouts of unexplained intoxication that dated back 10 years and were getting worse. Some thought he must be a closet drinker, and his mother regularly had him use a breathalyzer. That showed high blood alcohol levels even when she was certain he had not had alcohol. Even odder, when he drank several colas, he sometimes became drunk.Doctors previously had diagnosed the man’s intoxication problem as autobrewery syndrome, a rarely reported condition in which people become drunk from starchy or sugary foods. It is thought to be caused by gut fermentation, aided by an abundance of yeast. But antifungal treatment had no effect on the man. Liver biopsies showed he had nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), the severe form of NAFLD. He was moved to the intensive care unit and closely observed. Doctors noted that after he ate a meal high in sugar, his blood alcohol level rose to as high as 400 milligrams per deciliter. “That’s equivalent to 15 shots of 40% [80-proof] whisky,” Yuan says.Because some other microbes can metabolize sugars into alcohol, Yuan and colleagues analyzed 14 of the man’s stool samples taken at different times for species-specific bacterial DNA fragments. They found that when he was most intoxicated, 18.8% of the bacteria in a sample were K. pneumoniae, a 900-fold increase over normal. When they put these bacteria in a medium of yeast and sugar, they could isolate strains of the bacterium that produced high, medium, or low levels of alcohol. That’s equivalent to 15 shots of 40% [80-proof] whisky. By Jon CohenSep. 19, 2019 , 11:25 AMlast_img read more

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Germany football boss Joachim Loew eyes fresh start against Serbia

first_imgNetherlands and Croatia join the Euro 2020 list Amid fears that German football is in decline, Loew, 59, is under pressure to show that he can build a new era of success around a younger generation of players. “We are facing a new challenge. As I have said before, we need to be quicker, more dynamic and more ambitious,” said Loew. “We need to give the young players the feeling that they have our complete and total trust,” said Loew. Catch up on all the latest sports news and updates here. Also download the new mid-day Android and iOS apps to get latest updates Euro 2020: We are not favourites, says Germany’s Toni Kroos Report: Bayern Munich approached PSG boss Thomas Tuchel for coach job Germany coach Joachim Loew hopes to prove his critics wrong and open 2019 with a win when his new-look team host Serbia in a friendly in Wolfsburg tonight. Loew is hoping to bounce back from a painful 2018, in which Germany suffered an early World Cup exit and were relegated from the top tier of the UEFA Nations League. The friendly against Serbia is a warm-up for Sunday’s prestigious opening Euro 2020 qualifier away to the Netherlands with the Germans hunting revenge after a 3-0 thrashing at the hands of the Oranje last October at the Amsterdam Arena.Related Newslast_img read more

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3rd Test: Kraigg Brathwaite key as West Indies close in on historic Test victory over Pakistan

first_imgOpening batsman Kraigg Brathwaite and Shane Dowrich lifted West Indies to within sight of a consolation win in the third test on Wednesday, and denying Pakistan a clean sweep.West Indies bowled out Pakistan in the middle session for 208 to set up a target of 153, and was a tense 114-5 at stumps on day four. The visitors need 39 more runs for their first win in 14 tests and 18 months, and first win away from home against a major team since 2007.Brathwaite, who carried his bat in the first innings, was yet again unbeaten on a composed 44 off 88 balls. Dowrich was 36 not out.West Indies was a dodgy 67/5 when they came together, adding 47 runs. (SCORECARD)Legspinner Yasir Shah three for 30 and Wahab Riaz two for 30 dented the West Indies run chase.Pakistan, already leading the series 2-0, collapsed from 87/4 overnight to be all out with more than four sessions left in the match.West Indies captain Jason Holder secured his maiden five-wicket haul with five for 30.Azhar Ali top-scored with 91 and added 86 runs with Sarfraz Ahmed (42) before both fell to leg-spinner Devendra Bishoo (3-46) while attempting needless shots. Holder grabbed the last two wickets to finish off Pakistan.last_img read more

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All England Championships: Saina Nehwal bows out after quarter-final loss

first_img Abreshmina S Quadri BirminghamMarch 8, 2019UPDATED: March 8, 2019 19:04 IST All England Championships: Saina Nehwal lost to Tai Tzu Ying in straight games. (@BAI_Media Photo)HIGHLIGHTSSaina Nehwal lost 15-21, 19-21 to Tai Tzu Ying in All England quartersSaina was defeated in just 37 minutes by the world No.1This was Saina’s 13th straight defeat vs the TaiwaneseSaina Nehwal bowed out of All England Championships after a straight-games loss to world No.1 Tai Tzu Ying of Taiwan in the quarter-finals at the Birmingham Arena on Friday. Saina lost 15-21, 19-21 in just 37 minutes to register another loss against Tai Tzu.This is Saina’s 13th straight loss against the world No.1, who is the undisputed standout in the women’s singles.Tai Tzu’s deception and nonchalant magic has been troublesome to every women’s singles player since the past three years and Saina has been no different.Saina played brilliantly and gave her heart out at the court on Friday but had nothing much to show for it on the scoreboard.Always gracious, @NSaina praised Tai Tzu Ying after a great match which kicked off Quarter Finals day at the YONEX All England.She also had a message for young female badminton players from on #InternationalWomensDay#YAE19 #AllEngland19 https://t.co/Qo9sZYd3XD pic.twitter.com/IFNPBoQuj4Yonex All England (@YonexAllEngland) March 8, 2019Tai Tzu started the game on a high tempo and did not allow Saina to get into the game. It did help the world No.1 that Saina took her time to settle into the match and played some weak shots early on.Tai Tzu took a massive 11-3 lead at the break and Saina was even admonished by her husband and player Parupalli Kashyap for some “stupid shots”.Saina fought back hard after the break bringing into play her strategy of stiffling Tai Tzu at the back of the court and reduced the massive gap to 12-14.advertisementHowever, Tai Tzu upped the ante once again from there and ran off to take the first game 21-15.Saina started the second game well taking an 8-3 lead over the world No.1 as she was playing the Taiwanese around the court and grinding out her points.However, Tai Tzu brought her impeccable skills once again to reduce the gap before Saina took an 11-8 lead into the break.From there, Tai Tzu began storming back into the game, churning out quick but delightful points.From tailing 8-11, Tai Tzu took a 14-13 lead over Saina and never looked back from there.As Saina looked increasingly tired, Tai Tzu played around with her strokes, having fun at the cost of Saina and easily took the match to make it to the semi-finals and stayed on course for a hat-trick of All England titles.For sports news, updates, live scores and cricket fixtures, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for Sports news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Tags :Follow Tai Tzu YingFollow All England ChampionshipsFollow Saina Nehwal Next All England Championships: Saina Nehwal bows out after quarter-final lossAll England Championships: Saina Nehwal lost in straight games to world No.1 Tai Tzu Ying in the quarter-finals to bow out of the tournament in Birmingham.advertisementlast_img read more

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Research Vessel Investigator to Be Delivered at the End …

first_img03 and 04 Decks – Senior Officers and Sr. Scientist accommodations and offices My location  First Platform Deckscientist’s accommodation forward; stores and transceiver room midships, and control room, switchboard room, winch room and container hold aftMain Deckcontains all the science labs, CTD lab offices and workshops and is the primary working deckForecastle Deckcrew accommodation, galley, mess, lounge spaces and g alley stores, with the upper level CTD lab and CTD winch spaces aft and enclosed anchor and mooring space forward02 Deck Level – senior crew, offices, hospital, chemistry lab, and boat deck Wheelhouse – the large and extensively equipped bridge is located above a full height plenum containing bridge equipment and HVAC systemThe complete suite of fisheries, scientific, and ship’s deck equipment was supplied by Rapp-Hydema, including an array of coring, trawling, towing, general purpose, CTD deployment, drum, and anchor/capstan electric winches. Triplex AS, a Rapp-Hydema subsidiary, supplied the coring boom, pipe handler, over stern A-frame, and CTD Overhead crane. The aft deck is serviced by a Bergen DKF300 Main Crane, with a capacity of 25 Tonnes at 12m, or 5 Tonnes at 20 m. In addition there are also a Bergen DKF40 utility crane and a Bergen DKF70 stores crane fitted.Roll stabilization on the ship is provided by a U-Tube tank system designed by HOPPE.“We are delighted to have been selected to design the Investigator, and the entire teaming arrangement with Teekay and Sembawang has proven extremely successful. This remarkable vessel will be the new benchmark for research vessels worldwide. The vessel enters service, fully commissioned, less than three years after award of the design and construction contract; a remarkable feat given the size and complexity of this ship,” said the company in its press release. Robert Allan, December 4, 2013center_img Print  Close 此页面无法正确加载 Google 地图。您是否拥有此网站?确定 zoom At the end of 2013, the team of Sembawang Shipyard of Singapore and Teekay Shipping Australia will hand over the new scientific Research Vessel Investigator to her Owners, the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO), an agency of the Federal Government of Australia.The Investigator will be among the most capable and quietest non-naval research vessels in the world. It will serve Australia in diverse scientific operations ranging over an area from the equator to the ice shelf of Antarctica and spanning almost 1/3rd of the circumference of the globe. An area this large is hugely diverse and the types of research to be undertaken are numerous and demanding, resulting in the need for a very flexible, capable and seaworthy research vessel.The “design and build” contract for construction of this ship was awarded to a team led by Teekay Shipping Australia and Sembawang Shipyard of Singapore. The design was developed by RALion, a joint venture between Vancouver BC Naval Architects, Robert Allan Ltd, Alion Science and Technology of Alexandria, Virginia and Alion Canada of Ottawa. The contract was awarded to this international team in January 2011. An extensive program of model testing and design work was completed by November of that year. The vessel was launched on July 21st, 2013 and then officially named Investigator at a ceremony in Singapore on September 5th. It is due to be completed and turned over to the Owners at the end of 2013.Investigator has been designed to handle the heat and humidity of the tropics and the cold and ice of Antarctica while working safely and effectively in the broad expanse of the Great Southern Ocean separating these extremes. This ice capable vessel has also been designed to meet the underwater radiated noise requirements of the DNV “Silent R” notation up to 11 knots – a capability that enables her to undertake the most sensitive types of environmental research.Investigator is fitted out with a full range of scientific laboratories, science and fishing winches, coring equipment, air and water sampling devices, and acoustic systems. It is capable of general-purpose oceanographic survey operations in coastal and deep ocean areas, including the physical, chemical and biological oceanography, multi-discipline environmental investigations, ocean engineering and marine acoustics, coastal hydrographic survey, marine geology and geophysics, bathymetric surveys and fisheries research.In support of these missions, the ship is extensively equipped to perform all the following tasks: Acoustic habitat mappingAcoustic surveys in support of bathymetric, geomorphological and biological research using a combination of hull-mounted, drop keel mounted, and towed transducersAcoustic surveys of marine speciesAcquiring geological samples of the ocean bottom in depths of up to 5000 mAcquisition of benthic samples of the ocean bottom at depths up to 6500 mAcquisition of up to 20-30 m core samples of the ocean bottom at depths up to 7000 mBottom trawling to depths of up to 4000 mCalibration of ship mounted transducersConduct horizontal or oblique plankton tows over the stern or over the side of the VesselConduct oceanographic sampling with rosettes of up to 36 bottles and CTD instrument packages to > 6500 m depth while continuously soundingFreeze and cold store samples for further analysis at shore based facilitiesLaunch / tow / retrieve a broad variety of active and passive sensors and sensor platforms including magnetometers, hydrocarbon sniffers, sonar towfish, AUVs and UUVsLaunch/tow/retrieve a variety of egg, larval, juvenile and adult fish sampling systemsMarine mammal and seabird enumeration, identification, tracking, and bio assessmentMid-water and surface trawlingTo accomplish the scientific missions above, the Investigator is fitted with a gondola and two retractable drop keels to house the extensive scientific sonar and transducer suites, supplied by Kongsberg. The vessel is fitted with a stern ramp to support fisheries research activities.The Investigator is classed by Lloyds Register of Shipping with the following notation:+100A1, +LMC, UMS Ice 1C IWS, EP, Research Vessel, DP (AM) and DNV SILENT-R.The principal design characteristics of this ship are as follows:Length Overall:            – 93.9 metersBeam:                              – 18.5 metersDepth to Main Deck:   – 9.45 metersDraft:                                – 5.7 metersDraft, Navigational:      – 6.9 meters (to bottom of gondola)Complement:                  – 60 (including scientists)Vessel Speed:                  – 15 knots, fully loaded in Sea State 2Range:                                – 10,800 nautical milesEndurance:                       – 60 daysThe vessel is twin screw, powered by an integrated diesel – electric propulsion and ship service plant provided by L3 Marine Systems. Three Mak 9M25C diesel generators provide a total electrical output of 9 MW at 690 V. To meet the noise requirements of DNV Silent R notation, all three diesel generators are double resiliently mounted on a raft system engineered by RALion and supplied by Mak. The L3/Indar 690 V AC 2600 kW propulsion motors feature a resiliently mounted rotor and other design features to meet the noise requirements. These propulsion motors are believed to represent the first use of AC motors of this size range in a research vessel to meet DNV Silent-R requirements. Wartsila provided the 3.5 m diameter 5-bladed propellers, which are specially designed to be cavitation free at 11 knots, and the complete shaft-line from motors to propeller. The ship is also equipped with an azimuthing, retractable bow thruster, Thrustmaster model TH1500MLR, rated at 1200 kW and with Becker Flap type high lift rudders, all creating a vessel with much enhanced manoeuvrability at low speeds.last_img read more

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JES Blacklisted

first_imgzoom The Supreme People’s Court of China has blacklisted Jiangsu Eastern Heavy Industry (JEHI), a subsidiary of Singapore-listed JES International for failing to settle its debt obligations. JEHI has yet to pay up RMB15m (USD 2.4m) stemming from 5 separate lawsuits filed between January and April 2014 by various equipment suppliers, Seatrade Global reports.The Supreme Court has put JEHI on a so-called list of dishonest companies, comprised of the business entities which have the financial means, but refuse to pay their debts.JES claims that the accumulated debts are a part of warranty funds, which will be paid to the suppliers upon the expiry of the equipment warranties.“According to the court’s award, suppliers should complete all defects and JEHI should return them the 5-10% (warranty fund). The suppliers asked the court to enforce JEHI to repay the warranty funds, but since the suppliers have not completed all defects, JEHI refused to release the warranty funds,” JES spokesperson said.World Maritime News Staff, July 25, 2014last_img read more

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India Invites Bank Bids to Handle Cochin IPO

first_imgzoom The Indian government has called for the expression of interest from merchant bankers to manage the initial public offering of Cochin Shipyard’s shares, the government said.Under the sale, the Indian government will relinquish its 10 percent stake in the shipyard in order to raise funds for infrastructure expansion.The proposal, which should raise an amount of Rs 33.984 crore, will include an issue of an IPO of over 3 million equity shares, comprising a fresh issue of over 2 million shares and sale of the government’s stake of over one million shares.Merchant bankers are to submit bids for the IPO mandate by February 18, 2016.Cochin Shipyard’s workers recently said that if the government proceeds with the sale, they would stage an indefinite strike. Namely, the workers want the money for the expansion to be raised by other means.The move is in line with the shipyard’s plan to start the construction of the country’s first LNG carriers.World Maritime News Stafflast_img read more

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Modi speaks good English but he just doesnt want to talk Trump

first_imgBiarritz/London: Prime Minister Narendra Modi speaks very good English, but he just doesn’t want to talk, US President Donald Trump said jokingly on Monday before the two leaders met for formal talks on the sidelines of the G-7 Summit. The two leaders held 40-minute discussions in Biarritz, the French town which is hosting the meeting of the world’s most industrialised nations. The two leaders exchanged a warm handshake and spoke to the media. Modi answered questions posed by reporters in Hindi. “He (PM Modi) actually speaks very good English, he just doesn’t want to talk,” Trump joked when Prime Minister Modi asked reporters to let the leaders talk in privacy. The two leaders also held each other’s hand while everybody present in the room burst into laughter.last_img read more

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Defence asks Supreme Court to hear case of man charged with Cindy

first_imgEDMONTON – Defence lawyers are asking the country’s top court to weigh in on the case of an Ontario trucker accused of murdering an Indigenous woman.Lawyers for Bradley Barton have filed an application for leave to appeal to the Supreme Court of Canada.Barton was originally acquitted by a jury of first-degree murder in the death of Cindy Gladue.The Alberta Court of Appeal ordered a new trial in June, ruling serious errors were made during the trial and the judge’s charge to the jury about Barton’s conduct and on the law of sexual assault relating to consent.Gladue, a 36-year-old sex-trade worker, was found in a bathtub in an Edmonton motel room in 2011. She bled to death from a vaginal wound after a night of what Barton described as consensual, rough sex.The appeal ruling was applauded by advocates who said they hoped it would change the way courts deal with Indigenous women and sexual offences.In a news release Wednesday, the law firm of Dino Bottos said the Appeal Court made several serious mistakes, including changing the law “in dramatic fashion, imposing a raft of mandatory new jury instructions that previously were matters for the trial judge’s discretion.”The firm said it wants the acquittal to stand and says the case is especially deserving of being heard by the Supreme Court.“At all levels the case has generated an inordinate amount of media attention, stimulating nationwide discussion about the issues raised. Furthermore, the stakes of this appeal for the applicant could not be higher, as the case involves the reversal of an acquittal granted by a jury to a charge of first-degree murder.”GRAPHIC WARNING: This story contains details that may disturb some readers.Barton’s trial heard that he hired Gladue for two nights of sex in June 2011. He testified that during both nights he put his fist in her vagina, and on the second night she started bleeding.Barton said when he woke up the next morning, he found her dead in the tub and phoned 911.A medical examiner testified for the Crown that an 11-centimetre cut in Gladue’s vagina wall was caused by a sharp object.Gladue’s vagina had been preserved and, in an unusual move, the examiner used it as an exhibit as he described the wound to the jury.The Institute for the Advancement of Aboriginal Women and the Women’s Legal Education and Action Fund took exception to the Crown’s decision to use Gladue’s preserved vagina as evidence in the trial.They said Gladue’s family has never been able to properly bury her because they don’t have all of her remains.last_img read more

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Cong manifesto a document of false promises, aimed at ‘balkanisation’ of India: BJP

first_imgNew Delhi: The BJP Tuesday slammed the Congress’s poll manifesto as “dangerous and unimplementable”, alleging that was aimed at “balkanisation” of India and was drafted by Congress chief Rahul Gandhi’s friends in ‘tukde-tukde gang’. Hitting out at the manifesto which which was released by the Gandhi scion, senior BJP leader and Finance Minister Arun Jaitley said, “When out of ignorance, he makes implementable and dangerous promises, I am sure the country will not be in a mood to oblige.” Also Read – India gets first tranche of Swiss bank a/c details Addressing a press conference at the BJP headquarters here, he claimed it was divisive and aimed at “balkanisation of India,” and added that the Congress does not deserve “even a single vote” for its promises, including doing away with sedition law. Even former prime ministers Jawaharlal Nehru, Indira Gandhi and Manmohan Singh did not dare change the law, he claimed. Jaitley in a blog said, “The manifesto compromises national security and has sham and bluff promises with little detailed understanding of the subjects involved. It is an irresponsible document which has never to be implemented since the Congress looks a certain loser.” Also Read – Tourists to be allowed in J&K from Thursday On the proposed amendments in the Armed Forces (Special Powers) Act, he said it compromised national security. The Congress earlier wanted martyr status for jawans, now they want cases against them, the Union minister said. “Those who laid their lives for the nation, the Congress wants them to be prosecuted at the behest of relatives of terrorists,” he alleged. Jaitley alleged that though the party had set up a drafting committee, it appears that some important points related to Jammu and Kashmir were drafted by Rahul Gandhi’s friends in ‘tukde tukde’ gang. He was referring to the Congress president’s visit to Jawaharlal Nehru University in solidarity with protesting students against the arrest of the student union leader Kanahiya Kumar. On farm loan waiver, the minister said even tokenism had not been done on the issue in the five states where the Congress was in power and said, “It is an attempt to further their tradition of bluff and betrayal.” On Nyay, the minimum income scheme, Jaitley said,”It is a bluff scheme. You only make such promises when you know you would never get a chance to implement them.” He pointed out that in the manifesto, Nyay had become a joint scheme of the central and the state governments, diluting the initial announcement.last_img read more

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Basil asserts SLFP rebels will form new alliance

SLFP joint opposition members have already decided to boycott the SLFP anniversary celebrations in Kurunegala over the weekend. (Colombo Gazette) Former Minister Basil Rajapaksa today asserted that Sri Lanka Freedom Party (SLFP) members in the joint opposition will form a new political alliance.He said that the new alliance will have a symbol under which it will contest future elections.

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EthiopiaEritrea UN mission confirms calm in temporary buffer area

In a statement released jointly in Asmara and Addis Ababa, the UN Mission in Ethiopia and Eritrea (UNMEE) cited Ethiopian allegations that Eritrea had deployed nearly 30,000 regular troops in the TSZ. Ethiopia had also accused UNMEE of a policy of “appeasement” towards Eritrea.”In response UNMEE undertook immediate investigations including ground and air reconnaissance patrols in all three sectors of the TSZ and has found no indication of an Eritrean military buildup,” the Mission stated.While unsubstantiated press reports had alleged that Eritrean forces invaded and controlled pockets of Ethiopian territory in the western sector, “UNMEE’s installations and patrols in the area report no unusual activity.”Noting that allegations of major troop buildups and accusations of appeasement “do not help the cause of peace,” UNMEE urged restraint by both parties. read more

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UN appeals for safety for humanitarian workers in Somalia after recent abduction

Aid workers in strife-torn Somalia should be able to operate in safety with full access to those in need, a senior United Nations official said today, in the wake of the recent abduction and release of a UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF) staff member in the south of the impoverished Horn of Africa country.Christian Balslev-Olesen, Acting Resident/Humanitarian Coordinator for Somalia, made his comments as UNICEF staffer Robert McCarthy was reunited with his family in Nairobi, Kenya, after spending about 30 hours held captive by armed men.“Aid workers should be able to operate without fear and we appeal again to all political and religious leaders, elders, the business community and opinion leaders in Somalia to ensure the safety of humanitarian workers and the critically-needed assistance they deliver, especially during the current drought,” Mr. Balslev-Olesen said.“We cannot save lives if we cannot reach the communities that are in need, and we are not guaranteed safe passage.”Mr. McCarthy, aged 47, was released unharmed into the custody of UN security staff and members of the Somali Transitional Federal Government on Thursday, after being abducted on the outskirts of Afmadow, 110 kilometres northwest of Kismayo in the Lower Juba region of Somalia a day earlier.After his release, McCarthy thanked the local community, the elders and the Transitional Federal Government for their support while he was in Afmadow and said he would want to continue to work in Somalia.UNICEF has around 200 staff working for its Somalia operation and of these, about 75 are based at the agency’s Somalia Support Centre, in Nairobi, Kenya and the rest inside Somalia. About 30 international staff work for UNICEF Somalia.UNICEF has been operating in Somalia since 1972 and, following the collapse of the Government in 1991, it has continued to render services to children and women, working with local administrations where they exist, Somali communities, local and international non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and other UN agencies to help deliver services. read more

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Buckeye defense cant defend poor play against Michigan

OSU defensive coordinator and linebackers coach Luke Fickell yells at his players during The Game Nov. 30 at Michigan Stadium. OSU won, 42-41.Credit: Ritika Shah / Asst. photo editorIn the game of college football, a win’s a win, no matter how or at what cost.For the No. 2 Ohio State Buckeyes (12-0, 8-0), their 24th victory in a row might have been the toughest of the streak to date, a 42-41 win on the road against archrival Michigan (7-5, 3-5) that saw the OSU defense give up a season-high 603 yards to the Wolverines.Such a performance garners questions to be directed at the team’s defensive coordinator, and OSU’s Luke Fickell was no exception Monday.When asked about what he thought went wrong in Saturday’s win, Fickell didn’t take kindly to the question.“What do you mean what went wrong? Did we win? Did we win?” Fickell said. “I’ve been up (in Ann Arbor) quite a few times in my 18-year career here … We know there’s things we have to correct, momentum and things happened and we didn’t play great on the defensive side of the ball so there’s a lot of things to correct. Every single week we have objectives and the last objective last week was win, and we came away with a win.”Don’t tell that to junior linebacker Ryan Shazier, though, who called the unit’s performance Saturday “bittersweet” even though the team won the game.“The most important thing at the end of the day is getting a ‘W,’” Shazier said. “But we (are) still pretty mad … the whole defense is pretty pissed off about how many yards we gave up rushing and passing. It’s just not acceptable.”Even though the Buckeye defense struggled all game, it did make a big play when it mattered most as redshirt-freshman cornerback Tyvis Powell picked off Michigan redshirt-junior quarterback Devin Gardner’s two-point conversion pass attempt with 32 seconds left to ice the game.Powell said after the game he knew that play was coming thanks to cornerbacks coach and special teams coordinator Kerry Coombs, which Fickell said is all part of weekly preparation.“You prepare. You don’t know exactly, but when you do your studies and you have an idea,” Fickell said. “Obviously, you see the things that we rep we do a lot better job of … but that (play) was one of the things that we had repped and had a good idea but it comes down to the guy making the play.”OSU’s defense gives up an average 255.8 passing yards per game, tied for 101st in the country with Northwestern. The whole season, the team has been able to compensate for the lack of consistency on that side of the ball, but coach Urban Meyer remains confident in them.“(The) pass defense surfaced again, and (a) lack of contact on the quarterback,” Meyer said Monday. “We just had some guys running open … I trust that we’ll get it fixed, and I trust that these guys will be locked and loaded and have a good week of preparation.”The Spartan offense ranks third to last in the Big Ten in total offense with 380.2 yards per game, but is better than that number indicates, Shazier said.“They have playmakers out there,” Shazier said. “They would not have went undefeated in the Big Ten so far if they weren’t (good) so I feel like they’re doing a great job right now.”After watching the film of Saturday’s win against Michigan, sophomore linebacker Joshua Perry said the defense was “really close” to stopping the Wolverines from a lot of their big plays. The mistakes, though, were pretty evident.“When you turn on the film you gotta face the facts and realize that there were some mistakes made,” Perry said. “We got a chip on our shoulder, but it’s nothing that’s too urgent like we gotta throw out the whole defense and start over again. It’s just that we gotta correct up what we know to do.”Whether there are questions about the defense as a whole or specifically about their performance against Michigan, Fickell said it all comes back to one thing.“You have a standard, and that’s what’s been set around here. And I think that’s the beauty of it,” Fickell said. “You’re never satisfied with what you got.”The Buckeyes and No. 10 Spartans (11-1, 8-0) are set to face off for Big Ten supremacy Saturday at 8:17 p.m. at Lucas Oil Stadium. read more

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NHL Lockout Sides 182 Million Apart Says Donald Fehr

Negotiations to end the NHL lockout just cannot sustain any momentum.Talks broke down Wednesday afternoon and NHLPA head Donald Fehr said there was “no movement” on the major issues. Translation: It does not look good, still.Earlier, players gave management a new proposal that the union said left sides less than $40 million apart annually over a five-year contract. That’s about $180 million.Wednesday was the 67th day of the lockout. More than a quarter of the regular season already has been canceled.No date for the next bargaining session was set.After a day away from bargaining for internal discussions, union officials and nine players were at the NHL office for an hour Wednesday. There was little optimism. The NHLPA scheduled an internal players’ conference call for 5 p.m. ET Wednesday.“We did give them the proposal,” Fehr said. “They indicated they’re going to have a response to us a little later on.”Fehr added that players made a percentage-based proposal and said it reflected the economic impact the work stoppage had caused.“We have moved far more than halfway,” Fehr said. “It is about as good as we can do.”NHL commissioner Gary Bettman on Oct. 16 proposed a 50-50 split of hockey-related revenue. With guaranteed contracts likely to push the players’ share over the halfway mark originally, management wants that money to come out of future years to bring the overall percentage down to an even split over the length of an agreement.Players previously had proposed they receive a guaranteed amount of income each year.“Gary said we were $900 million or $1 billion apart,” Fehr said, referring to the gap over a five-year deal. “At the moment we are exactly $182 million apart.”The NHLPA offered to accept the NHL’s proposed 50-50 split of hockey-related revenue right from the first year of a deal, NHLPA sources told ESPN.com.However, the NHLPA proposal calls for the “make whole” provision to go up from the $211 million the NHL offered two weeks ago to $393 million, the sources said.The NHLPA’s latest proposal was the result of a major push by the moderates in the union’s membership to submit a new offer, a source told ESPNNewYork.com.Those players, the source said, stressed the importance of moving off the guaranteed player amount featured in previous proposals and moving to the NHL’s preferred percentage-based division of revenue. The move was an attempt to get the two sides “speaking the same language” so as to expedite a deal, the source said.A source confirmed to ESPNNewYork.com that the breakdown on the “make whole” payments through Years 1-4 (deferred by one year) is as follows: 2012-13: $182 million; 2013-14: $128 million; 2014-15: $72 million; 2015-16: $11 million.One interesting feature of the NHLPA’s offer is that, beginning in Year 2, the players’ share in dollars cannot be lower than the previous year. That protects the players from both the potential devaluation of the Canadian dollar and a possible decline in revenue, thereby shifting the risk onto the owners.The league has canceled 326 games through Nov. 30, plus the Jan. 1 Winter Classic between Toronto and Detroit at Ann Arbor, Mich.This is the league’s fourth work stoppage in 21 years and third lockout since 1994. The previous lockout led to the cancellation of the 1994-95 season. read more

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Microsoft fined 731 million for removing Windows 7 browser choice screen

first_imgMicrosoft is facing a massive fine from the European Commission after removing the Browser Choice Screen from copies of Windows 7 back in February 2011.The Browser Choice Screen existed so as to give Windows users across Europe a choice as to what web browser to use by default. It caused a bit of a headache for Microsoft when Windows 7 launched as Internet Explorer was so heavily integrated into the OS and Vista that came before it. But it worked out and European users got to make a choice.Then in February 2011 a Windows Update that installed Windows 7 Service Pack 1 removed the choice screen from the operating system. Microsoft explained that this was done in error, but it didn’t reappear for 14 months. Obviously the European Commission wasn’t happy, especially as during that period Microsoft claimed it was still allowing users the browser choice option.Microsoft has since apologized and co-operated with the EC investigation that followed. They could have been fined as much as $7.4 billion (10 percent of the company’s revenue in 2012), but the fine has now been set at a still massive $731 million. The reason it remains so high is because the EC wants to make it clear no company can get away with what they class as a “serious breach” of an antitrust infringement procedure commitment.It seems that Microsoft has little choice other than to pay the fine and move on. You can be sure that a few extra checks will be made to Windows updates in future as not even Microsoft can afford to pay out that much money on a regular basis.last_img read more

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